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Results Found (18), Result Page (1 of 1)
Search Aspect (red hall )
Location - City Centre

[1]Central Library, Tiled Hall, Restoration (City Centre)
Central Library, Tiled Hall, Restoration19th April 2007. View showing the Tiled Hall in the Central Library, during work in progress to restore this magnificent hall to its original Victorian splendour. Formerly occupied by the Commercial and Technical Library and later the Music Library but closed since 1999, the fully restored hall was finally opened to the public again in June 2007 as a cafe and shop linking the Library with the adjoining Art Gallery.
[2]Central Library, Tiled Hall, Restoration (City Centre)
Central Library, Tiled Hall, Restoration19th April 2007. View of a corner of the Tiled Hall in the Central Library, during restoration work to return this room to its original Victorian splendour. In June 2007 the restored hall was reopened to the public as a new cafe and shop linking the Central Library to the adjoining Art Gallery.
[3]Central Library, Tiled Hall, restoration (City Centre)
Central Library, Tiled Hall, restoration2006. View of the Tiled Hall in the Central Library showing work in progress on the restoration of this magnificent example of Victorian architecture to its former splendour. The fully restored Hall reopened in June 2007 as a cafe and shop.
[4]Central Market (City Centre)
Central MarketUndated. Located on Duncan Street, the central market building was designed by Francis Goodwin. It opened in 1827, the cost of building was £30,000. There were 67 shops and 56 stalls in a covered hall. In 1893 the market was badly damaged by fire, the building of Kirkgate market made Central market obsolete.
[5]King Charles Hotel, Lands Lane (City Centre) (7 comments)
King Charles Hotel, Lands Lane14th June 1937. Image taken from near the entrance to the Queen's Arcade, shows the King Charles Hotel which stood at the corner of Lands Lane (foreground & right) with King Charles Croft (left). The King Charles Hotel opened in 1845 but was demolished to build the new Schofields store, c1975. It had actually closed down as a public house ten years before, on the 5th May, 1965. Sherwins Restaurant, advertising 'Suppers', is on the right at number 17 Lands Lane. It closed down after 100 years of service, again to make way for the new extension to Schofields. Stanley's draper is visible, next door to Sherwin's at number 19. Stanley's was adjacent to the Victoria Arcade, the elaborate arched entrance of which can be partially seen at the right edge. Stanley's also occupied two more shops beyond the Victoria Arcade, numbers 21 and 23. The Victoria Arcade was built to commemorate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1898 to designs by Thomas Ambler. Snowden Schofield (1870-1949) opened his drapery business at number 1 Victoria Arcade on the 4th May, 1901 and began to expand his business, gradually acquiring more shops in the arcade. Schofield purchased the Victoria Arcade in 1947 and it was demolished in 1959 for the expansion plans. Years earlier, in 1912, he had also purchased Red Hall as part of his plans for the department store. King Charles Croft gave access to Red Hall, a substantial house believed to be the first building to be constructed in red brick in Leeds, hence the name. It dated from 1628 and was originally the home of wool merchant, Alderman Thomas Metcalfe. The grounds, including orchards, extended as far as Albion Place and King Charles Croft now occupies the site of the gardens of Red Hall. Red Hall was famous for the 9th February 1646 when King Charles 1 spent the night, as a prisoner of the Scots, on the journey from Newark to Newcastle. The room became known as the King's Chamber and was incorporated into Schofields 'Old English Cafe' in 1912. Red Hall was demolished in 1961 for the continued development of Schofields.
[6]King Charles Street, Red Hall (City Centre) (3 comments)
King Charles Street, Red Hall1914 View looks from King Charles Street onto the Red Hall. This property was built in 1628 and was probably the first brick building in Leeds. At the time of this view, the lower floor is being used as a garage for Rover Motor Cars. Red Hall was demolished in 1961.
[7]Lands Lane (City Centre) (5 comments)
Lands Lane 24th April 1979. View of Lands Lane looking in the direction of Commercial Street. The pedestrian precinct, created in 1972, is thronged with shoppers. On the left are: The Light Bite, King Jobs, job centre at number 26, John Peters'Furniture Store in the 1922 Scala House, formerly a cinema and Ivey Travel on the corner with Albion Place. On the right is Schofields on the site of Red Hall and on the other corner with Albion Place is the 1868 Church Institute buildings. In the background the rear of the 1970 C&A store is visible which front on to Boar Lane, and to the left of it, the spire of Holy Trinity Church.
[8]Red Hall (City Centre)
Red Hall1865. Red Hall, north front, Guildford Street. An 1865 photograph of the house built in 1628 for Thomas Metcalf, merchant and under-bailiff of Leeds, and alderman from 1630 to 1637. Reputedly the first brick-built house in Leeds, it was on the site of the Schofields Centre. King Charles I was imprisoned there in 1646/7; according to legend, the Leeds benefactor John Harrison presented him there with a tankard of ale which was actually filled with gold pieces. The 'King's Chamber', a large room on the first floor, was converted to Schofield's cafe in 1912. During the alterations a six-pound shot was found embedded in the south front, a relic of the 'Battle of Britain' in 1643, when Sir Thomas Fairfax took the town for the Parlimentary forces despite the entrenchments which stretched from St. John's Church past Red Hall to Boar Lane, Swinegate and the river. In the eighteenth century the house was occupied by Richard Thornton, the Recorder of Leeds who helped Ralph Thoresby with his history of Leeds, 'Ducatus Leodiensis' (1715), and later by Henry Ibbetson, made a baronet by George II for raising a body of men to help put down the 1745 rebellion. It was still used as a house in the nineteenth century; Sir Frederick Johnson was the last person to be born there, in 1890. However, many rooms were sublet as offices (this photograph shows a ground floor room in use as solicitors' offices) and it was bought by Snowden Schofield in 1912 for incorporation in his stores. The last remnants of the hall were demolished to make way for the Schofield's store opened in 1962.
[9]Red Hall, Guildford Street, Upperhead Row (Headrow) (City Centre)
Red Hall, Guildford Street, Upperhead Row (Headrow)Undated. View of the north side of Red Hall situated in Guildford Street on Upperhead Row, now part of the Headrow. It is believed to be the first red brick building in Leeds, hence the name. Red Hall was built in 1628 for wool merchant, Alderman Thomas Metcalfe. The grounds, including orchards, stretched as far as Albion Place and the street, King Charles Croft, is now built on the site of the original garden. During the Civil War, on the night of the 9th February 1646, King Charles I was held in captivity by the Scots at Red Hall while en route from Newark to Newcastle. The Leeds benefactor, John Harrison is believed to have offered the King a tankard of gold with which to bribe his captors. This act is commemorated in a stained glass window in St John's Church. In late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the house was being used as offices and when this photograph was taken it was occupied by Newstead and Wilson, a firm of solicitors (James Shaw Newstead & Edmund Wilson, 1882 Directory of Leeds). Red Hall was purchased in 1912 by Snowden Schofield (1870-1949)who was gradually expanding his drapery business around this area of Upperhead Row, so as to build a large department store. The room which Charles had occupied, known as the 'King's Chamber' became part of the 'Old English Cafe' in the store. The house was demolished in 1961 for further development of Schofields. Photograph by Wormald of Leeds.
[10]Red Hall, King Charles Croft (City Centre) (1 comment)
Red Hall, King Charles CroftUndated, Watercolour image shows people standing outside Red Hall, probably the first red brick building in Leeds. Built in 1628 for Alderman Thomas Metcalfe (appointed 1630) the grounds and arches spred to Albion Street. The garden became King Charles Croft, eventually becoming home to the Tivoli and Theatre Royal in the 1800s. On the 9th February 1646/47 King Charles I was imprisoned here and it was reputed that John Harrison brought the King a tankard of gold coins to bribe his captors with, something the King declined. From then on the room was known as the Kings Chamber and the event depicted in stained glass in St John's Church
[11]Red Hall, King Charles Croft, (City Centre) (7 comments)
Red Hall, King Charles Croft, Undated. Image shows Red Hall from the south-west, at the junction with King Charles Street, left, and King Charles Croft, right. A glimpse of Guildford Street, Upperhead Row, (now known as The Headrow) is visible at the left edge. Red Hall is believed to be the first red brick building in Leeds. It was built in 1628 for wool merchant, Alderman Thomas Metcalfe (appointed 1630). The grounds and orchard spread as far as Albion Place. The garden became home to the Tivoli and Theatre Royal in the 1800s. During the English Civil War, on the 9th February 1646 King Charles I was held prisoner and lodged here overnight. He was being conveyed from Newark to Newcastle by his captors, the Scots. It is reputed that John Harrison brought the King a tankard of gold coins to bribe his captors and buy his freedom. The room was known ever after as the 'King's Chamber' and the event is depicted in stained glass in St. John's Church. The building continued as a residence for Richard Thornton and Sir Henry Ibbetson in the 18th Century and Samuel Blakelock in the 19th Century. Later in the nineteenth century Red Hall housed offices including a firm of solicitors, Newstead & Wilson (James Shaw Newstead and Edmund Wilson) Local shop proprietor, Snowden Schofield, keen to expand his drapery business to a department store, bought Red Hall in 1912. He was already amassing retail property in the Victoria Arcade (1903 & 1908) where he began his Leeds business in 1901. The King's Chamber became part of Schofield's 'Old English Cafe'. Red Hall was demolished in 1961 for further development of Schofields department store and eventually became the site of the 'Headrow Shopping Centre' (1990). At time of writing (2013) it is known as 'The Core'. A two wheeled cart or bogie can be seen in the corner of the building, left, and a sign which reads 'Commit no nuisance'. Photograph by Wormald of Leeds.
[12]Red Hall, King Charles Street (City Centre) (1 comment)
Red Hall, King Charles Streetc1910. Photo Mattison. Erected in 1628 by Thomas Metcalfe, it was the first red brick house in the town centre. Charles 1 stayed here in 1646. Later The Red House was the home of Richard Thornton the 'Recorder of Leedes' and then of Henry Ibbetson (Mattison A and Meakin W 1908 The Romance of Old Leeds. Used as a Rover car showroom at the time of this photograph. Purchased by the Schofield family in 1912 and restored. Demolished in the 1960s as Schofield's store was redeveloped.
[13]Royal Visit, King Edward VII (City Centre)
Royal Visit, King Edward VII7th July 1908 View of Briggate with decorations for the visit of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. This was the first visit to Leeds by a King of England for over 250 years, when Charles the first had been kept prisoner at Red Hall. Schofields Shopping Centre is on this site. In 1908, the Royal visit was to open new University buildings. On the left of this view, entrance to Pack Horse Yard can be seen.
[14]St John's Church, New Briggate, Memorial Window (City Centre)
St JohnUndated Image shows a section of the Harrison Memorial Window installed in St John's Church in 1885. The image depicts scenes from the life of John Harrison who endowed the church which was consecrated on the 21st September 1634. This window shows John Harrison smuggling a tankard of gold coins to King Charles I as he is held prisoner at Red Hall in 1646.
[15]The Headrow, Red Hall (City Centre) (1 comment)
The Headrow, Red HallUndated. The back view of Red Hall on the Headrow. Red Hall was the first building in Leeds constructed of brick. Built in 1628. (Mattinson and Meakin 1908 p82). Photograph by Mattison.
[16]The Headrow: Victoria Arcade (City Centre)
The Headrow: Victoria Arcade3th June 1930. A photograph of June 1930 which shows Schofields on either side of the Cock and Bottle, but before the store took over the whole of Victoria Arcade. The L-shaped arcade was designed in 1898 by Thomas Ambler and named to celebrate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee; it connected Upperhead Row with Lands Lane. The glazed roofs of the two arms of the arcade met in a glass dome, and the archway in Upperhead Row, decorated in faience, was topped with an image of Queen Victoria. Snowden Schofield came from Liverpool to see an old colleague, H.G. Shipman, who had his own menswear business in the shop to the left of the Victoria Arcade entrance on Upperhead Row; he persuaded Schofield to take the shop on the opposite corner. The shop was opened on 4 May 1901; its official histories note that the takings for the first day were £62 3s 4½d., '£43 10s. of which was in gold'. Within the next 5 years Schofield extended into several other shops in the arcade, and then more than doubled the size of the shop by moving into Red Hall. In the early 1920's he acquired the courtyard and Headrow frontage, and then built the first and second floors of a new extension at the back of the Red Hall between 1930 and 1931. The old Hippodrome was taken over for workshop and warehouse space in 1934. In 1938 he acquired the Cock and Bottle, and in 1947 the whole of Victoria Arcade. He died on 24th March 1949. In 1961, the whole site was redeveloped into a new Schofields store. Developed again since into Schofields Centre, Schofields having ceased to trade. The Cock and Bottle, thought to be around 200 years old, was a coaching inn from where coaches departed to Yeadon and Ilkley. It was sold to Schofields in 1938 and demolished for store expansion. In the foreground is the site of the new Lewis's store.
[17]The Red Hall, King Charles Croft, Print (City Centre)
The Red Hall, King Charles Croft, PrintUndated. Print by Percy Robinson titled 'The Red Hall, King Charles Croft'
[18]Tower Cinema, New Briggate (City Centre) (3 comments)
Tower Cinema, New Briggate1970. View showing the Tower Cinema which was opened as the Tower Picture House on the 12th April 1920 in the old Grand Arcade, New Briggate. the Grand Arcade was originally built by the New Briggate Arcade Company in 1897. The Picture House and conversion of the Grand Arcade were to designs by architect, J. P. Crawford of Leeds. The Theatre was aable to seat 1,188 and admission prices were: ground floor - 9d (4p) and 1/- (5p); Circle 1/6d (7.5p) and 2/- (10p). The opening film was 'The Kinsmen' starring Chrissie White, James Carew and John McAndrew and there was also a Charlie Chaplin film. The Tower Picture House was originally to be called the 'Red Hall' but the Managing Director, Mr. J. F. Tidswell was concerned it would be referred to locally as the 'Red 'oil'. He had overheard it described as such while travelling on a tramcar. This image shows advertising for 'My Side of the Mountain' starring Teddy Eccles and Theodore Bikel and 'Hello Down There' with Janet Leigh and Tony Randall. The Tower closed as a cinema in 1985 and became a nightclub from 1986.