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Results Found (8), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect ( Cock Beck )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Cock Beck Public House, Barwick Road (Cross Gates)
Colour image2000. View of the red brick public house, the Cock Beck, situated in Barwick Road. The exterior of the building is decorated with tubs, hanging baskets and window boxes of summer bedding plants. The pub takes its name from the Cock Beck that runs in the vicinity, an affluent of the River Wharfe at Tadcaster. The name most likely comes from the Old English 'Cocc' for cock or woodcock, and 'Bekka', a stream. Cock Beck is mentioned in accounts of the 7th Century Battle of Whinmoor between the pagan King of Mercia, Penda, and the christian King Oswy.
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[2]
Cock Bridge, north of Towton (Bramham)
Black & White imageJune 1904. View of Cock Bridge over Cock Beck situated north of the village of Towton. Towton is famous for the bloody battle of the Wars of the Roses which proved crucial in securing the throne for Yorkist Edward IV. The battle took place south of Towton, between Towton and Saxton on Palm Sunday, 29th March 1461. The Yorkists defeated the Lancastrians in a fierce snowstorm. Cock Beck was in full spate, trapping the Lancastrians. Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland was one of the Lancastrian leaders killed that day. Many who were not put to the sword drowned in the beck. Almost 29,000 men died at Towton, some of whom, it is thought, may be buried at the East End of Bramham churchyard. A mass grave was detected at Towton Hall in 1996 and has been the site of a fascinating archeological excavation.
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[3]
Cock Bridge, north of Towton (Bramham)
Black & White imageJune 1904. Cock Bridge spanning Cock Beck, north of Towton. Cock Beck is an affluent of the River Wharfe at Tadcaster. The name may have come from the Old English 'cocc' meaning 'cock or 'woodcock'and 'bekkr' meaning 'stream'. The bridge probably took the place of a ford carrying the Roman Road from Tadcaster to the South.
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[4]
Cock Bridge, north of Towton (Bramham)
Black & White imageJune 1904 Cock Bridge spanning Cock Beck, north of Towton. Towton was the scene of a crucial battle in 1461 during the Wars of the Roses. Cock Beck is probably derived from the old english 'cocc' meaning 'cock or woodcock' and 'bekkr' meaning 'stream'. It is an affluent of the River Wharfe at Tadcaster. A ford existed where Cock Bridge is situated carrying the Roman Road from Tadcaster to the South. Cock Beck is liable to floods.
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[5]
Stanks Lane (Swarcliffe)
Black & White image14th December 1954. howing Stanks Estate between Stanks Lane and Cock beck, North of Barwick Road. In the foreground, a waterlogged muddy field, rutted with vehicle tracks. Beyond the field, a row of trees and council houses.
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