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Results Found (3), Result Page (1 of 1)
Search Aspect ( Flint Mill )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
River Wharfe showing the Weir and Flint Mill (Thorp Arch) (1 comment)
Black & White imageUndated. The Flint Mill is located about one and a quarter miles upstream of Thorp Arch Bridge near the western boundary with Wetherby. It began as a water powered corn mill around 1772 but when the sails of a Leeds windmill collapsed and were irreparably damaged in 1774 the mill began to grind flint for Leeds Pottery owned by Hartley Green and Company. Thorp Arch was a good location for this industry as the flint was transported by sea from the south coast and upstream from the Humber Estuary via the Rivers Ouse and Wharfe as far as Tadcaster. It was then moved by horse and cart to Thorp Arch. Eventually, due to the changing fortures of Hartley Green and Company the mill reverted back to grinding corn, also to shelling oats. When this image was taken in the late 19th century the corn miller here was Richard Lister. The Lister family are listed on the census for 1851 and in a Kelly's directory for the West Riding of Yorks for 1897. In the photograph the waterwheel and weir can be seen. The mill ceased to operate in 1954 and became derelict until it was converted to a private dwelling in 1975.
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[2]
Thorp Arch, Flint Mill (Thorp Arch) (2 comments)
Black & White image17th October 1903, Undated. View of the Flint Mill,located about one and a quarter miles upstream of Thorp Arch Bridge near the western boundary with Wetherby. It began as a water powered corn mill around 1772 but when the sails of a Leeds windmill collapsed and were irreparably damaged in 1774 the mill began to grind flint for Leeds Pottery owned by Hartley Green and Company. Thorp Arch was a good location for this industry as the flint was transported by sea from the south coast and upstream from the Humber Estuary via the Rivers Ouse and Wharfe as far as Tadcaster. It was then moved by horse and cart to Thorp Arch. Eventually, due to the changing fortures of Hartley Green and Company the mill reverted back to grinding corn, also to shelling oats. When this image was taken in the late 19th century the corn miller here was Richard Lister. The Lister family are listed on the census for 1851 and in a Kelly's directory for the West Riding of Yorks for 1897. In the photograph the waterwheel and weir can be seen. The mill ceased to operate in 1954 and became derelict until it was converted to a private dwelling in 1975.
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[3]
Thorp Arch, Flint Mill (Thorp Arch) (2 comments)
Black & White image17th October 1903, The Flint Mill is believed to have been built around 1772 as a corn mill. The adjacent Flint Mill Grange was possibly built around this time by the Green Family. The Greens were partners in the Leeds Pottery which was famed for the pierced creamware produced by the Hunslet works. Ground flint had been added to the earthenware, it whitened the finished product and made the clay easier to shape. The flint was used as ballast in sailing ships and was transported as far as Tadcaster by river. It was then only five miles, using carts to the Flint Mill. It would be Kiln roasted at high temperatures then crushed. After grinding it was turned into paste with water. Two deliveries a week were taken to Hunslet by horse and cart. About 1806 Hatley, Green and Co were in financial difficulties and the business closed for a while. Flint grinding stopped and subsequent use of the mill was restricted to milling flour or cattle food. The original Hartley and Green pattern books from Leeds Pottery were donated to Leeds Libraries and are housed in a secure area of the Central Library.
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