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Results Found (10), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect ( Hark To Rover )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Abbey Walk (Kirkstall) (5 comments)
Black & White image26th July 1950. king north-east to the junction of Spen Lane and Abbey Walk from the top of Abbey Walk. The photograph has the proposed widening painted onto it to show how it will look. The ivy covered house is the Lodge. The white rendered house on the far right is the end of a row of cottages known as Hark to Rover. To the far left, a stone wall with trees behind .
[internal reference; 8798:CLIC Abbey 38]
[2]
Abbey Walk (Kirkstall) (2 comments)
Black & White image26th July 1950. Looking north-east from the top of Abbey Walk to the junction with Spen Lane, showing the proposed widening. To the left, a large stone wall with trees behind. Over the junction is the Lodge, an ivy covered detached house. To the far right, the end of a row of cottages known as Hark To Rover. In the foreground the surfaced road edged with cobbles on the left.
[internal reference; 8797:CLIC Abbey 39]
[3]
Abbey Walk (Kirkstall)
Black & White image26th July 1950. Junction with Spen Lane looking north-east, before widening. The tarmac road is edged with a cobbled section. A large stone wall is to the left of this, with trees behind. At the top of the hill on the right is an ivy covered detached house known as The Lodge. The white rendered house on the far right is the first of a row of cottages known as Hark To Rover. In front of these houses a hedge, wooden gates and a stone wall.
[internal reference; 8800:CLIC Abbey 37]
[4]
Hark to Rover (Kirkstall) (5 comments)
Black & White image2nd December 1935 Row of cottages on Morris Lane named Hark To Rover. Some people think that the name is derived from a local legend concerning a barmaid, Mary, who worked at the Star and Garter. She had taken a lover who was involved with a gang of highwaymen. They had waylaid and killed a victim at Kirkstall Abbey. She witnessed her lover burying the body, screaming and wailing in distress. Her dog, back in the cottage, heard her and began to bark incessantly when he heard her scream! A poem by Robert Southey 'The Maid of the Inn' narrates a tale, which is thought by some to be set at Kirkstall Abbey.
[internal reference; 2002426_76636905:C LIC Morris (6)]
[5]
Morris Lane (Kirkstall) (6 comments)
Black & White imagec1967. View of Hark to Rover Cottages. There is a stone wall in front of the cottages. A lamp post is also visible.
[internal reference; 9576:browsing neg no 636]