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Results Found (7), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect ( Medieval )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Lynchet embankment near Foundry Lane (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. Image show a lynchet embankment near Foundry Lane, important evidence of Medieval strip farming. The lynchet embankments run from Foundry Lane, south-west to the site of the former Killingbeck Farm. In Medieval times the farm that existed here was known as Killingbeck Grange Farm. A grange was a monastic farm and means that this farm had associations with the Cistercian monks of Kirkstall Abbey. In the top, left-hand corner is a high-rise block of flats thought to be Parkway Grange in Foundry Lane. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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[2]
Lynchet Embankment, looking south-west (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. View of lynchet embankment looking south-west. The lynchets are evidence of medieval farming in the area and run from Foundry Lane to the site of Killingbeck Farm. In Medieval times the farm here was part of the Temple Newsam Estate and was known as Killingbeck Grange Farm. A Grange is a monastic farm and meant that it had links with the Cistercian Abbey at Kirkstall. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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[3]
lynchet field, looking south (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. View of lynchet field looking south. Lynchets are old embankments which, in this case, show evidence of strip farming as far back as medieval times. The trees in the background are on the site of an old farm, Killingbeck Farm, which in 1915 became the site of Killingbeck Smallpox Hospital, with the farmhouse being converted to an Administration block. During the medieval period the farm that existed here was known as Killingbeck Grange Farm (described as such in a 1340 survey of Seacroft). A Grange was a monastic farm and Killingbeck Grange Farm had associations with the Cistercian monks of Kirkstall Abbey at one time. In contrast, the tower blocks on the right are Pembroke Grange, left, and Pembroke Towers, right, built in 1964. They are 36 metres in height on 12 storeys and are situated in Wyke Beck Valley Road. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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[4]
Lynchet slope near Foundry Lane (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. View of a lynchet slope near Foundry Lane, evidence of medieval farming. A lynchet is a bank of earth which piles up over years of ploughing, usually on a hill slope. The area has a long history of farming which may even pre-date the middle ages. The farm land is mentioned in the Yorkshire Hundred, part of a country-wide investigation carried out in 1274-1275 during the reign of Edward I. At that time the land was held by the Templars of Newsam, and was gifted to them by William de Somervil and Walter de Kelingbec. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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[5]
Meadow looking towards Foundry Lane (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. View across a meadow filled with buttercups and other wild flowers. The view is towards Foundry Lane where tower blocks, Parkway Court and Parkway Grange, are visible in the background. The area is of historical interest as there is evidence of early farming practices in the form of lynchets which are thought to date from Medieval times or perhaps even earlier. The flora of the locality is believed to indicate the former existance of hay meadows. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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