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Results Found (8), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect ( Parkway Grange )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Killingbeck fields with tower blocks in the background (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. View of Killingbeck fields with tower blocks in the background. On the left is Parkway Court and at the right edge is Parkway Grange. These two residential blocks were built to a height of 44 metres on 15 storeys in 1967. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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[2]
Lynchet embankment near Foundry Lane (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. Image show a lynchet embankment near Foundry Lane, important evidence of Medieval strip farming. The lynchet embankments run from Foundry Lane, south-west to the site of the former Killingbeck Farm. In Medieval times the farm that existed here was known as Killingbeck Grange Farm. A grange was a monastic farm and means that this farm had associations with the Cistercian monks of Kirkstall Abbey. In the top, left-hand corner is a high-rise block of flats thought to be Parkway Grange in Foundry Lane. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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[3]
Lynchets along slopes of Killingbeck Hill (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. View of lynchets along slopes of Killingbeck Hill. Lynchets are raised mounds of earth which occur when ploughing has taken place over a sustained period of time on a slope. These lynchets are thought to date back to at least medieval times, and are stong evidence of early farming in the locality. In the background, left, is Parkway Grange in Foundry Lane, a residential tower block built in 1967 to a height of 44 metres. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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[4]
Lynchets in a field near Parkway Grange (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. View of Lynchets in a field near Parkway Grange in Foundry Lane. The lynchets can be clearly seen as raised mounds of earth, right. The lynchets have been caused by early farming methods on the slope, at least as far back as the medieval period. The term 'lynchet' comes from the old word of 'lynch' meaning an 'agricultural terrace.' The farmland would have been ploughed by teams of 8 oxen in the Middle Ages and the lynchets are likely to have been created by the plough over a long period of time. In the background, left, part of Parkway Grange can be seen. It is a tower block containing 87 residential units on 15 floors and was constructed in 1967. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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[5]
Lynchets in fields (Killingbeck)
Colour imageUndated. View of lynchets in fields looking towards blocks of high rise flats. The area is noted for the lynchets, which are raised banks of earth, and evidence of early farming from at least the medieval period. In the background, left is Parkway Towers in Brooklands Crescent, a 17 storey residential block with 99 flats dating from 1967. In the centre are two more high rise blocks, Parkway Court, left, and Parkway Grange, right. These are located in Foundry Lane and were built in 1967 on 15 storeys housing 87 residential flats each. Image courtesy of John Garnett.
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