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Results Found (6), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect ( Thomas Nicholson )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Dog's Mouth Spring, Roundhay Park (Roundhay)
Colour imageJuly 2011. View of Great Heads Beck in Roundhay Park. To the right of centre is what was originally an old drinking fountain known as Dog's Mouth Spring. In the early years of the 19th Century, under the ownership of Thomas Nicholson, there were many alterations made to the natural landscape of the park. This included the canalisation of Great Heads Beck, a natural stream and the creation of picturesque bridges, stepping stones, mini rapids, pools and drinking spots such as this one. The spring gets its name from the original carving on the soft sandstone which has now virtually disappeared. The carved dog's head can, however, be clearly seen on an old black and white image on the Leodis website, ID: 2004311_57996768. The copper drinking cup suspended from a chain and the stone vessel into which the water flowed have also gone. The Friends of Roundhay Park have restored the stone to allow the spring to emerge from the dog's mouth once again. The stones used to construct the formal edges of the stream are now to be found in the stream-bed as Great Heads Beck has followed its natural course again. Image courtesy of Graham Schofield.
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[2]
Dog's Mouth Spring, Roundhay Park (Roundhay)
Colour imageJuly 2011. Image shows a hole in a rock from which emerges a spring of water. It can be observed to the left of the path leading down 'The Gorge' as it nears the lake, just before the old stone bridge in Roundhay Park. The Spring is the remains of Dog's Mouth Spring (compare it to an old image on Leodis at 2004311_57996768). The shape of the stone is similar but the rudimentary carving of the dog's head appears to have eroded over time. Originally, a chain with a copper drinking cup was suspended from a fixture immediately above the top of the head. The spring flowed into a stone vessel which was mounted on a carved stone plinth. The recent photograph appears to show the remains of this. The stone vessel would have fit into the circular base but much of the base is buried or missing. The stream, Great Heads Beck, is a natural one but was manipulated in the time of the estate owner, Thomas Nicholson (early part of the nineteenth century) to form mini rapids, meanders and drinking spots such as this one. The sides of the stream were 'canalised' and, now that it has reverted to its natural course, many of the edging stones are scattered in the stream-bed. Image courtesy of Graham Schofield.
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[3]
Dog's Mouth Spring, Roundhay Park (Roundhay)
Colour imageJuly 2011. In the centre of the image Dog's Mouth Spring can be seen, situated in Great Heads Beck in Roundhay Park. Originally, the head of a dog was crudely carved in the square, soft sandstone rock and the mouth was represented by the hole through which the spring flows. This carving has all but disappeared but the flow of the spring through the rock face has, in recent years, been restored by the Friends of Roundhay Park. In the early part of the nineteenth century the canalisation and manipulation of Great Heads Beck was carried out under the instruction of the estate owner, Thomas Nicholson along with several other developmental schemes for Roundhay Park. The aim was to create a scenic waterway with rustic bridges, stepping stones, pools and mini rapids. The drinking fountain originally had a chain fixed to the rock above the carved dog's head with a copper drinking cup attached. The spring water flowed into a stone vessel mounted on a plinth. To see the drinking fountain as it once was you can view Leodis image 2004311_57996768. The stream has become naturalised again but the stones that once constructed the sides can be found scattered within it. Dog's Mouth Spring is number 6 in the Friends of Roundhay Park Geology Guide, a trail launched in 2008, and a marker stone can be seen to that effect. Image courtesy of Graham Schofield.
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[4]
Dog's Mouth Spring, site of stone vessel (Roundhay)
Colour imageJuly 2011. Image taken in Roundhay Park at the side of Dog's Mouth Spring in Great Heads Beck. A stone vessel once fitted into the central hollow (see Leodis image 2004311_57996768) Above the vessel there was a porous sandstone rock with a hole. The rock was carved with the stylised face of a dog and its mouth was represented by the hole. The spring emerged from here and a copper drinking cup secured by a chain was provided for visitors to drink the clear water that flowed into the vessel. Dog's Mouth Spring dates from the early 19th Century and was one of the many innovations made by the then owner of the estate, Thomas Nicholson. Recently, (2008) the flow of the spring through the hole in the rock has been restored by The Friends of Roundhay Park but the face of the dog is virtually eroded. Dog's Mouth Spring can be found to the left of the path leading down 'the gorge' as it nears the lake, just before the old stone bridge. Image courtesy of Graham Schofield.
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[5]
Roundhay Park, Castle Ruin (Roundhay)
Black & White imageC1950s. Image shows the ruined castle in Roundhay Park built in 1821 by George Nettleton for the owner of the park at the time, Thomas Nicholson. It was intended as an ornamental feature to provide entertainment for the family. The daughters of Thomas Nicholson took their sewing and enjoyed tea there.
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