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Results Found (3), Result Page (1 of 1)
Search Aspect ( Towton )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Cock Bridge, north of Towton (Bramham)
Black & White imageJune 1904. View of Cock Bridge over Cock Beck situated north of the village of Towton. Towton is famous for the bloody battle of the Wars of the Roses which proved crucial in securing the throne for Yorkist Edward IV. The battle took place south of Towton, between Towton and Saxton on Palm Sunday, 29th March 1461. The Yorkists defeated the Lancastrians in a fierce snowstorm. Cock Beck was in full spate, trapping the Lancastrians. Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland was one of the Lancastrian leaders killed that day. Many who were not put to the sword drowned in the beck. Almost 29,000 men died at Towton, some of whom, it is thought, may be buried at the East End of Bramham churchyard. A mass grave was detected at Towton Hall in 1996 and has been the site of a fascinating archeological excavation.
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[2]
Tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles and his wife, Cecilia, Waterton Chapel, Methley Church (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles, Sixth Baron Welles, Lieutenant of Ireland, and his wife, Cecilia located in the Waterton Chapel of Methley Church, the Church of St. Oswald. The alabaster recumbent figures lie against the South wall. Lord Welles was killed in the Battle of Towton, known as 'Palmesundayfield' in 1461. The story goes that his body was brought back to Methley hidden within a sack. His wife, Cecilia, was the daughter of Robert Waterton. The figures are a fine example of fifteen century work and are intricately carved Lord Welles is clad in armour with a lion at his feet and Cecilia is dressed in a long mantle. The tomb was restored in 1988.
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[3]
Tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles and his wife, Cecilia, Waterton Chapel, Methley Church (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the intricate carving of the fifteen century alabaster tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles and his wife Cecilia, heiress of Robert Waterton. The tomb is located against the South wall of Waterton Chapel in Methley Church, the Church of St. Oswald. Lord Welles is clad in armour having met his death at the Battle of Towton, known as 'Palmesundayfield' on 29th March in 1461. Cecilia wears a mantle and fifteenth century headdress. Angels are depicted bearing armoural shields of Wells, Waterton and others. On the left, the lion can be seen at the feet of the recumbent Lionel Lord Wells. St. Oswald's Church is mentioned in the Domesday survey of 1086 and has Saxon origins. It is named after Oswald King of Northumbria who was killed in Battle with Penda King of Mercia in AD 642.
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