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Results Found (8), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect ( Triumphal Arch )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
City Square Arch, Royal Visit to Leeds (City Centre)
Black & White image7th July 1908. View shows a Triumphal Arch erected on Wellington Street by City Square to welcome the Royal visit of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. The Royal couple were in Leeds to open a new electrical engineering wing at Leeds University. During their visit they also had lunch at the Town Hall with the Lord Mayor, Wilfred L. Hepton, and the Lady Mayoress.
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[2]
Parlington Hall Estate, the Triumphal Arch. (Aberford)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the Triumphal Arch on the Parlington Hall Estate, looking east towards Aberford. The arch was built by Sir Thomas Gascoigne in 1793 at the entrance of the drive from Cattle Lane. Some years before he had plans in place to built a new hall at Parlington but these never came to fruition. This is thought to have been because of the loss of his wife, Mary, who died a month after the birth of their son, Thomas Charles in 1786. The Triumphal Arch has an inscription across the top which reads 'Liberty in N America Triumphant' and refers to his support for the former British colonies on the North American continent fighting Britain for independence of the United States. The architect was Thomas Leverton (1743 - 1824).
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[3]
Parlington Hall Estate, the Triumphal Arch. (Aberford)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the Triumphal Arch on the Parlington Hall Estate. It was designed by architect Thomas Leverton (1743 - 1824) for Sir Thomas Gascoigne in 1793. The arch is located to the north of the now demolished Parlington Hall, at the entrance to the beech lined drive from Cattle Lane. Sir Thomas had had plans drawn up for a new house in the 1770s but it was never built. The death of his wife in 1784, one month after giving birth to their son, Thomas Charles, may have been an influential factor. It is thought that some of the stone used to construct the arch was taken from that reserved to build the new hall. The Triumphal Arch is inscribed with the words 'Liberty in N America Triumphant'. Sir Thomas Gascoigne was a supporter of the former British colonies' bid for independence in North America. There is a story that the Prince Regent was affronted by the inscription and chose to continue to Hazelwood Castle instead of lunching at Parlington Hall as planned.
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[4]
Royal Visit to Leeds, Triumphal Arch, Wellington Street (City Centre) (2 comments)
Colour image7th July 1908. Colour-tinted postcard showing a Triumphal Arch erected in Wellington Street alongside City Square to welcome King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra to Leeds. Crowds are lining the streets awaiting the Royal procession. The King and Queen were visiting the city to open a new electrical engineering wing at the University of Leeds, and while there also lunched with the Lord Mayor at the Town Hall.
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[5]
Royal Visit, King Edward VII, Triumphal Arch (Moortown)
Black & White image9th July 1908 Postcard view showing one of a pair of Triumphal Arches. Made of wood and plaster, the arches were erected on Harrogate Road. This was part of a processional route to Harewood. King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra visited Leeds to open on extension to the University and stayed at Harewood House. Crowds are waiting to greet the Royal party.
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