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Results Found (24), Result Page (1 of 5)
Search Aspect ( Waterton )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Church Street, numbers 71a to 75 (Hunslet)
Black & White imageUndated. This 1950s image shows very old housing and a partially cleared area. On the left, there is an advertising hoarding and the entrance to what was formerly Leak Street, once a small enclave of 17 properties. The houses in the foreground are in Church Street and number, from left to right, 71a and 73 Church Street, with part of the side wall of number 75 jutting forward at the right edge. Painted on the wall of number 75 is the sign 'Greenwood Bros. Midland Glass Works Office'. The rear of number 71a was also numbered as 17 Leak Street and it adjoined numbers 15 and 16 Leak Street. These last two properties are demolished in this image. In the distance a sign can be seen advertising Commercial Engineering Co Ltd. on the gable end of number 2 Waterton Terrace. Waterton Terrace runs parallel to Grove Road.
[internal reference; 2003328_13346499:WYAS (Church Street) Box no.34, no. 3]
[2]
Grove Road, numbers 20 to 26 (Hunslet)
Black & White image12th March 1968 View of Grove Road at the junction with Waterton Place, bottom left-hand corner. These are blocks of eight red brick back-to-back terraced homes. The four at the rear open onto Waterton Terrace. (The ground floor window in the gable end belongs to number 15 Waterton Terrace.) This section of Grove Road begins on the left with number 26, followed to the right by numbers 24, 22 then 20. There is a yard housing an outdoor toilet followed by another block of eight back-to-back houses starting with number 18 Grove Road at the right edge. Part of number 2 Waterton Place is visible in the background at the left edge. Grove Road begins at the junction with Church Street.
[internal reference; 2004126_20338076:WYAS Waterton Terrace (Hunslet) Box 366, no. 3]
[3]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. View of a gargoyle carved on the stone brackets that support the roof timbers of the chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. As a boy, the castleford born sculptor, Henry Moore, would visit a favourite aunt who lived in Methley. He made drawings of the strange little stone faces and also of the alabaster tombs in the Waterton Chapel. He started in later life that the Sculptures he encountered in Methley Church had an influence on his own approach to and passion for sculpture.
[internal reference; 2007814_164478:LQP 283 MAT 4]
[4]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows close-up detail of a curious stone gargoyle carved on the brackets that support the roof timbers of the chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. The sculptor Henry Moore visited the Church as a boy and sketched gargoyles such as this one, and the alabaster tombs within the Waterton Chapel. He said in later life they had, had an influence on his passion for sculpture.
[internal reference; 2007814_164480:LQP 283 MAT 5]
[5]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. View of a strange little gargoyle sculpted in stone on the brackets that support the roof timbers of the Chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. The Church dates from Saxon times but the Chancel was built in the twentieth century. This gargoyle has cross eyes, two horns and wings. The Castleford born sculptor Henry Moore visited Methley Church in his youth and he enjoyed making sketches of the gargoyles, even mischieviously comparing them to to Castleford residents of the time. These sculptures and those of the alabaster tombs in Waterton Chapel are known to have influenced Henry Moore in his future career as a sculptor.
[internal reference; 2007814_164481:LQP 283 MAT 6]