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Results Found (3), Result Page (1 of 1)
Search Aspect ( Welles )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Methley Church, the Waterton and Welles tombs in the Waterton Chapel. (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. View of the Waterton and Welles tombs in Waterton Chapel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. These alabaster tombs are a fine example of fifteenth century work and were restored in 1988. Against the South wall is the tomb of Lionel Lord Welles, killed in the Battle of Towton in 1461 and his wife, Jane, heiress of Robert Waterton. In the foreground is the tomb of Robert Waterton and his wife, Cecily, beneath a decorated canopy. The four lights of the stained glass south east window depict, from left to right, St. George, Rachel, St. Katherine and St. Francis. The window was erected in 1901 in the memory of Rachel Katherine Walpole, Viscountess Pollington, who died on 21st June 1854.
[internal reference; 2007814_164472:LQP 283 MAT 3]
[2]
Tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles and his wife, Cecilia, Waterton Chapel, Methley Church (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles, Sixth Baron Welles, Lieutenant of Ireland, and his wife, Cecilia located in the Waterton Chapel of Methley Church, the Church of St. Oswald. The alabaster recumbent figures lie against the South wall. Lord Welles was killed in the Battle of Towton, known as 'Palmesundayfield' in 1461. The story goes that his body was brought back to Methley hidden within a sack. His wife, Cecilia, was the daughter of Robert Waterton. The figures are a fine example of fifteen century work and are intricately carved Lord Welles is clad in armour with a lion at his feet and Cecilia is dressed in a long mantle. The tomb was restored in 1988.
[internal reference; 2007814_164464:LQP 283 MAT 1]
[3]
Tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles and his wife, Cecilia, Waterton Chapel, Methley Church (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the intricate carving of the fifteen century alabaster tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles and his wife Cecilia, heiress of Robert Waterton. The tomb is located against the South wall of Waterton Chapel in Methley Church, the Church of St. Oswald. Lord Welles is clad in armour having met his death at the Battle of Towton, known as 'Palmesundayfield' on 29th March in 1461. Cecilia wears a mantle and fifteenth century headdress. Angels are depicted bearing armoural shields of Wells, Waterton and others. On the left, the lion can be seen at the feet of the recumbent Lionel Lord Wells. St. Oswald's Church is mentioned in the Domesday survey of 1086 and has Saxon origins. It is named after Oswald King of Northumbria who was killed in Battle with Penda King of Mercia in AD 642.
[internal reference; 2007814_164467:LQP 283 MAT 2]