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Results Found (211), Result Page (1 of 43)
Search Aspect ( museum )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Abbey Gatehouse, north of Kirkstall Abbey, lithograph (Kirkstall) (2 comments)
Black & White imageAugust 1820 Image shows a lithograph from 1820 depicting the gatehouse to the north of Kirkstall Abbey. This was before the new turnpike road was built in 1827. The gatehouse was first converted to a residence by John Ripley, the last abbot, who lived there until his death in 1568. For the next three hundred years it existed as a farmhouse and this is how we see it in this lithograph. Later, it became a gentlemans residence and was occupied by the Butler family. Eventually, Colonel Thomas Walter Harding of the Tower Works, Holbeck owned the gatehouse until he sold it to Leeds City Council in 1925. It is now part of Abbey House Museum and has only recently undergone a £2.3 million restoration, including additions to the Victorian Streets and shops.
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[2]
Abbey House Museum (Kirkstall)
Black & White image13th February 1935. Abbey Road junction with Abbey Walk, which runs to side of Museum up to Morris Lane. Taken prior to road improvemnets. The Abbey House was originally the gate house for Kirkstall Abbey, it became detached when the turnpike road was built in 1827. From 1584, for 300 yeas it belonged to the Savile family. It became the home of the Butler and Beecroft families, also proprietors of Kirkstall Forge until 1889. It was sold to Leeds City Council in 1925 and opened as a folk museum in 1927. It has recently had extensive restoration work.
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[3]
Abbey House Museum (Kirkstall)
Black & White image28th March 1936. View of improvements to Abbey Walk, Workers can be seen relaying paving slabs. Abbey House was originally the gate house for Kirkstall Abbey, it became detached when the turnpike road was built in 1827. For 300 years it was the home of the Savile family. Then the home of Beecroft and Butler families (also running Kirkstall Forge) until 1889. It was sold to Leeds City Council in 1925 and opened as folk museum in 1927. It has recently had extensive restoration work.
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[4]
Abbey House Museum (Kirkstall)
Colour image2000s. View taken around 2005-2007 showing Abbey House Museum. Originally the gatehouse to Kirkstall Abbey it later became a private dwelling occupied at various times by the Savile, Beecroft and Butler families. It was later sold to Leeds City Council who opened it as a museum in 1927. This view shows the tea rooms which include an outdoor seating area.
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[5]
Abbey House Museum, Abbey Fold (Kirkstall)
Black & White imageUndated, Image shows Abbey Fold. The cobble stone paving with open drainage, visible on far right was taken from the Hunslet area and rebuilt as originally found to show Leeds during the Industrial Revolution. Visible on the left is the entrance to J. Gathercole, Wheelwright and Joiner. This c.1900 workshop is typical of those found in semi-rural communities in the West Riding where wheelwrights and joiners were a joint profession. Seen through the door are tools used for a variety of jobs including furniture repair, heavy timber work and all aspects wheel and farm wagon repair. On the left of Gathercole's, just visible is Christopher Scott, Sadler and Harness maker. On the far right of the image is Beecroft & Butler, Blacksmiths. Beecroft & Butler took over Kirkstall Forge in 1779 and from 1779 Abbey House was leased to George Beecroft and held by the Beecroft and Butler families until the 1880s when it was sub-leased to other tenants and in 1888 sold to Colonel North.
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