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Results Found (6), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect ( tomb )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. View of a gargoyle carved on the stone brackets that support the roof timbers of the chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. As a boy, the castleford born sculptor, Henry Moore, would visit a favourite aunt who lived in Methley. He made drawings of the strange little stone faces and also of the alabaster tombs in the Waterton Chapel. He started in later life that the Sculptures he encountered in Methley Church had an influence on his own approach to and passion for sculpture.
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[2]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows close-up detail of a curious stone gargoyle carved on the brackets that support the roof timbers of the chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. The sculptor Henry Moore visited the Church as a boy and sketched gargoyles such as this one, and the alabaster tombs within the Waterton Chapel. He said in later life they had, had an influence on his passion for sculpture.
[internal reference; 2007814_164480:LQP 283 MAT 5]
[3]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. View of a strange little gargoyle sculpted in stone on the brackets that support the roof timbers of the Chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. The Church dates from Saxon times but the Chancel was built in the twentieth century. This gargoyle has cross eyes, two horns and wings. The Castleford born sculptor Henry Moore visited Methley Church in his youth and he enjoyed making sketches of the gargoyles, even mischieviously comparing them to to Castleford residents of the time. These sculptures and those of the alabaster tombs in Waterton Chapel are known to have influenced Henry Moore in his future career as a sculptor.
[internal reference; 2007814_164481:LQP 283 MAT 6]
[4]
St. Mary's-in-the-Wood Church, Troy Hill (Morley)
Colour imageSeptember 1963. View of table tombs close to the south wall of St. Mary's-in-the-Wood Church in Troy Hill. All of these tombs, some of which are listed monuments, pre-date this church building which dates from 1875-78. They were in place when the Old Chapel occupied the site and were not moved when the site was re-used. The carving is only moderate now on most tombstones except for that in the centre foreground, which is better than usual, and the white one in the background, close to the church wall, where practically every scrap of information has weathered away. This white tomb belongs to Anne Dawson, daughter of the owner of Morley Hall, who married Alexander Wedderburn who became Lord Chief Justice and took the title, Lord Loughborough. Photograph from the David Atkinson Archive.
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[5]
Tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles and his wife, Cecilia, Waterton Chapel, Methley Church (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the tomb of Lionel, Lord Welles, Sixth Baron Welles, Lieutenant of Ireland, and his wife, Cecilia located in the Waterton Chapel of Methley Church, the Church of St. Oswald. The alabaster recumbent figures lie against the South wall. Lord Welles was killed in the Battle of Towton, known as 'Palmesundayfield' in 1461. The story goes that his body was brought back to Methley hidden within a sack. His wife, Cecilia, was the daughter of Robert Waterton. The figures are a fine example of fifteen century work and are intricately carved Lord Welles is clad in armour with a lion at his feet and Cecilia is dressed in a long mantle. The tomb was restored in 1988.
[internal reference; 2007814_164464:LQP 283 MAT 1]