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Results Found (80), Result Page (1 of 16)
Search Aspect (Abbey House )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Abbey House (Kirkstall)
Black & White image20th January 1927. Stone pillars and ornamental wrought iron gates at the entrance the Abbey House. The white area on the left is a length of material which has been hung across to highlight the iron-work.
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[2]
Abbey House (Kirkstall)
Black & White image11th April 1928. View of Abbey House and Grounds with railings and gate posts, gates. A notice-board displays opening times of the museum. Originally gate house for Kirkstall Abbey, it was sold to Leeds City Council in 1925. In 1927 it was opened as Abbey House Folk Museum.
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[3]
Abbey House (Kirkstall)
Black & White image11th April 1928. View of Abbey House and grounds. Originally the gate house for Kirkstall Abbey, it was separated from the ruins by the building of a new turnpike road in 1827. Now Abbey House Museum.
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[4]
Abbey House (Kirkstall)
Black & White image16th July 1929. Abbey House, once the gateway to Kirkstall Abbey, it became detached from it when turnpike road was built in 1827. It was built in 1152-1182. The last abbot John Ripley took it as his home until his death in 1568. From 1584, it was owned by the Savile family and used as a farmhouse. In 1779 the Butler family leased it from the Earls of Cardigan. Alterations were made in 1841. It became the home of George Beecroft of Kirkstall Forge and then the Butler family. In 1893 it was bought by Colonel Thomas Harding who lived there until 1912. In 1925 it was bought by Leeds City Council for £6,000. Photograph by Wormald of Leeds.
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[5]
Abbey House (Kirkstall)
Black & White image11th April 1928. This was the gate house for Kirkstall Abbey. It became separated from the abbey in 1827 when the new turnpike road was laid. It was built between 1152-82. The last abbot, John Ripley used it as his home. A number of notable families utilised it as a residence. The buildings were sold to Leeds City Council in 1925, it was opened as Abbey House Folk Museum in 1927. Between 1998 and January 2001 it underwent restoration and alteration which cost £2.3 million.
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