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Results Found (26), Result Page (1 of 6)
Search Aspect (Leeds West Indian Carnival )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Carnival Queen 1986, Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Black & White imageAugust 1986. Image shows the Carnival Queen chosen for 1986 at the Leeds West Indian Carnival, held annually. She is Lisa Condor and her elaborate costume of a sea anemone was designed by her brother, Hubon Condor.
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[2]
Chapeltown Road, day of the Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Black & White image25th August 1980. Crowds are gathered in Chapeltown Road on August Bank Holiday Monday, (25th August, 1980) to view the procession of the thirteenth West Indian Carnival to be held in Leeds since its beginnings in 1967. A group of youngsters have claimed a higher vantage point on top of a bus shelter. The procession was to leave Potternewton Park at 2pm to follow a route along Harehills Lane, Roundhay Road, Barrack Road, Chapeltown Road and Harehills Avenue before entering the park again for the judging of the elaborate and colourful costumes of the troupes and individuals, and of the steel bands. In the background are shops and businesses in Chapeltown Road, including Dispensing Chemist, D.A. Taylor, addressed as New Savile Parade, 139 Chapeltown Road, and Warsaw Stores, Delicatessen and Barbecue at number 151 Chapeltown. On carnival day the Polish Warsaw Stores did a brisk trade in salami, icecream, crips and cool beers.
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[3]
Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Colour imageUndated. View of a young woman wearing a colourful and elaborate costume created for the Leeds West Indian Carnival. She is dressed in blue and is supporting a white 'cage' on her shoulders where fish appear to be swimming in and out. A huge canopy of flames in red, orange and gold fan out behind her. The very first West Indian Carnival in Britain was held in Leeds in 1967. This year (2007) has been the 40th anniversary of the Leeds West Indian Carnival and marks the Bi-centenary of 200 years since the end of the slave trade. It also coincides with the 800th year of Leeds as a city. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
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[4]
Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Colour imageUndated. In the view a child demonstrates the waving tentacles of this purple, octopus like creature costume at the Leeds West Indian Carnival. Many people have gathered in Potternewton Park for the occasion, which is held over the August Bank Holiday weekend. In the park there is a wide variety of entertainment and stalls providing all kinds of Carribean food and refreshments. The carnival is in the 40th year (2007) since it's origins in 1967. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
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[5]
Leeds West Indian Carnival (Chapeltown)
Colour imageUndated. View of one of the fantastic creations designed and worn for the Leeds West Indian Carnival which has been held over the August Bank Holiday weekend each year since 1967. The costume, in gold and white, consists of a many layered skirt, a gold sequinned top and a huge circular head dress trimmed with white ostrich feathers. The wearer's face is partially concealed by a gold mask. The Leeds West Indian Carnival assembles in Potternewton Park and forms a procession of floats and dancers proceeding along Harehills Avenue, down Roundhay Road in Harehills, along Barrack Road and back along Chapeltown Road returning to Potternewton Park once more. Photograph courtesy of Max Farrar.
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