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Results Found (9), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect (Methley Church )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. View of a gargoyle carved on the stone brackets that support the roof timbers of the chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. As a boy, the castleford born sculptor, Henry Moore, would visit a favourite aunt who lived in Methley. He made drawings of the strange little stone faces and also of the alabaster tombs in the Waterton Chapel. He started in later life that the Sculptures he encountered in Methley Church had an influence on his own approach to and passion for sculpture.
[internal reference; 2007814_164478:LQP 283 MAT 4]
[2]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows close-up detail of a curious stone gargoyle carved on the brackets that support the roof timbers of the chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. The sculptor Henry Moore visited the Church as a boy and sketched gargoyles such as this one, and the alabaster tombs within the Waterton Chapel. He said in later life they had, had an influence on his passion for sculpture.
[internal reference; 2007814_164480:LQP 283 MAT 5]
[3]
Methley Church, detail of stone gargoyle (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. View of a strange little gargoyle sculpted in stone on the brackets that support the roof timbers of the Chancel of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald. The Church dates from Saxon times but the Chancel was built in the twentieth century. This gargoyle has cross eyes, two horns and wings. The Castleford born sculptor Henry Moore visited Methley Church in his youth and he enjoyed making sketches of the gargoyles, even mischieviously comparing them to to Castleford residents of the time. These sculptures and those of the alabaster tombs in Waterton Chapel are known to have influenced Henry Moore in his future career as a sculptor.
[internal reference; 2007814_164481:LQP 283 MAT 6]
[4]
Methley Church, interior view to the East window. (Methley) (1 comment)
Colour imageUndated. Interior view of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald looking towards the east window. The present East window with five lights dates from 1926. The nave measures almost 57 feet (approx. 17 metres) and there is an aisle of three bays of about 13 feet (nearly 4 metres) wide, with pointed arches supported on low octagonal piers, right. The Church was reseated in 1624 but the benches seen here, with poppy head ends, were installed around 1900. Other alterations were undertaken at this time as a result of faculty granted to the Rector and churchwardens dated 15th June 1899.
[internal reference; 2007814_164486:LQP 283 MAT 8]
[5]
Methley Church, postcard view of the interior (Methley)
Black & White imageUndated. Old postcard view of the interior of Methley Church, Church of St. Oswald looking down the nave towards the East window. The poppy head decorated benches were installed in 1901 when several alterations were made to the church as a result of a faculty granted in 1899. The Church was re-opened following the renovations on Saturday 26th October 1901 by the Bishop of Ripon.
[internal reference; 2007814_164487:LQP 283 MAT 9]