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Results Found (3), Result Page (1 of 1)
Search Aspect (Moor Allerton Hall )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Hopkins Gardens looking towards Queen Street (Morley)
Colour imageMay 1970. View along the paths to the roundabout in the centre of the Hopkins Gardens and out to the shops on Queen Street in May 1970. Although many of the trees are in blossom the two large ash trees on either side of the image look to have bare branches. The same two trees appear on a sketch of Morley House to be seen in William Smith's 'Morley Ancient and Modern'. They were situated at either side of the house so they are a good guide to its relative position within the park. Although Morley House for about 200 years was the home of the Scatcherd family, it ended up in the early 1900s in the possession of Mr. R. Borrough Hopkins, Morley's first Town Clerk. He lived at Moor Allerton Hall in Leeds but left Morley House and its grounds in his will to be an extension to Scatcherd Park known as the Hopkins Gardens. The extension was laid out between 1936 and 1939, after Morley House had been demolished. Photograph from the David Atkinson Archive.
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[2]
Moor Allerton Hall, Lidgett Lane (Moor Allerton) (3 comments)
Black & White imageJune 1965. View looks across a driveway onto Moor Allerton Hall which is situated off Lidgett Lane. This Grade II listed building was built in the late 18th Century as a country house. Later the house was converted to Moor Allerton Hall County Primary School and is now in use as luxury flats.
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[3]
Moor Allerton Hall, Lidgett Lane (City Centre) (7 comments)
Black & White imageJune 1965. View shows Moor Allerton Hall, a Grade II listed building north of Lidgett Lane. Also known as Allerton House or the White House, this is a late 18th Century property. The central section of the house has a porch with Tuscan columns and is topped with a balustraded parapet. The entrance is flanked by two bow fronted bays, the one to the right providing an alternative entrance to the property.
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