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Results Found (9), Result Page (1 of 2)
Search Aspect (Moss Hall )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Moss Hall, Alwoodley Lane (Alwoodley)
Black & White image4th June 1938 Moss Hall is a grade 2 listed building. It was built in 1583, one of the oldest buildings in this area. There were two cottages in the grounds, Moss Hall cottage and White cottage. This is the back view of cottage and stable. At this time, the property was occupied by Gerald and Fred Fountain.
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[2]
Moss Hall, Alwoodley Lane (Alwoodley) (3 comments)
Black & White image4th June 1938 Moss Hall is a grade 2 listed building, one of the oldest in the Alwoodley area. In the grounds are two cottages, White Cottage and Moss Hall Cottage. This view is of cottage and stable building. The property was occupied by Fred and Gerald Fountain.
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[3]
Moss Hall, Alwoodley Lane (Alwoodley)
Black & White image4th June 1938 Moss Hall is one of the oldest buildings in the Alwoodley area, listed as grade 2. It was built in 1583, partial view to the right, the mullioned windows can be seen. Gable end of the cottage with conservatory and garden. There were two cottages in the grounds. Property owned at this time by Fred and Gerald Fountain.
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[4]
Moss Hall, Alwoodley Lane (Alwoodley) (2 comments)
Colour image25th September 2011. Image shows Moss Hall, a Grade II listed building located near the Sandmoor golf course in Alwoodley Lane. It is built in coursed squared gritstone on two storeys with a blue slate roof. There is a twentieth century addition at the left-hand side. Moss Hall replaced a timber-framed building with stone flagged roof which once stood on the site. This was a farmhouse which was occupied by William Stead in the 17th century. A small drawing of the house appears on Joseph Parker's map of 1682, shortly before it was demolished. It also shows the land leased by William Stead which amounted to 117 acres, made up of arable land, some meadowland but more than half of bogland. The bog was known as 'Great Moss' which is where Moss Hall gets its name. The baptisms of William Stead's children are recorded in Harewood Parish Register between 1684 and 1687 so he may have needed a larger house to accommodate his growing family. When the new house was under construction some of the timbers from the demolished property were incorporated. There is a plaque in the present Moss Hall with a date of 1583 and the initials 'R.C.' From 1682 to 1693 the Manor of Alwoodley was owned by Roger Jackson and in 1729 it was purchased by Robert Benson (c1676-1731), the 1st and last Baron of Bingley, for the sum of £6,671, 17s 6d. (Above information from 'An Illustrated History of Alwoodley' by Steven Burt.) According to research undertaken by Fred Fountain whose family occupied Moss Hall from 1918 to the mid 1950s, it was once the meeting place for the Manorial Court Sessions, the last one recorded being in 1796.
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[5]
Moss Hall, Alwoodley Lane (Alwoodley)
Colour image25th September 2011. View of Moss Hall, located near the Sandmoor Golf Course in Alwoodley Lane. The building is Grade II listed and is thought to date from the late 17th century. Moss Hall replaced an earlier timber-framed house, which, at the time of its demolition belonged to William Stead. Some of the timber was used in the construction of the present Moss Hall and a plaque with the date 1583 and the initials R.C. is preserved in the property. Information from 'An Illustrated History of Alwoodley' by Steven Burt.
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