leodis logo

Leeds City Council

Open archives compliant site

Supported by BIG Lottery Fund

Enrich UK Lottery Fund

Results Found (24), Result Page (1 of 5)
Search Aspect (Spencer Place )
Location - Leeds & District

[1]
Chassidishe Synagogue, 46 Spencer Place (Chapeltown)
Black & White imageUndated. Interior view of the Chassidishe Synagogue located at number 46 Spencer Place. It was purpose built on land previously occupied by Spencer Hall. The new Synagogue opened in 1935 and was funded and furnished by the efforts and skills of the congregation. The pulpit in the centre, was made by Max Kowalsky, cabinet maker of Crawford Street. Another cabinet maker, Barnet Feddy made the Ark behind the plush curtain given by Mrs Labofski, centre. Above the Ark is a marble tablet bearing the 10 commandments presented by Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Cohen. The two tablets either side of the Ark display a 'Prayer for the new moon' and a 'Prayer for the Royal family' and were presented by Max Goldberg, a tailor. The wooden seating flanking the Ark was the work of the three Collins brothers of S.H. Collins & Co., joiners of 6 Lower Brunswick Street. The seating for the congregation was provided by Nathan Solomon of Larchfield Mills and upholstered by Mr. Pitt of Northern Veneers, Leather Street. The synagogue closed in the 1980s and services continued for a time at Talmud Torah in Shadwell Lane.
[internal reference; 20081211_168047:L296.65 P566]
[2]
Chassidishe Synagogue, 46 Spencer Place (Chapeltown) (1 comment)
Black & White imageUndated. View of the Chassidishe Synagogue at number 46 Spencer Place which dates from 1935. The congregation moved here from the Leylands area when they bought Spencer Hall for £700. The hall proved unsuitable for a synagogue so it was decided to demolish it and design a new building, the one seen here. Many of the members contributed their skills, like carpentry, soft furnishing and upholstery to fit out the interior. From an initial membership of 50, numbers had risen to 240 by 1952. In later years, however, the migration of the Jewish population meant that numbers were declining and the synagogue closed c1983. Nowadays, the building houses a mosque, 'Leeds Islamic Centre'.
[internal reference; 20081215_168064:L296.65 P566]
[3]
Chassidishe Synagogue, 46 Spencer Place, an interior view (Chapeltown)
Black & White imageUndated. Interior view of the Chassidishe Synagogue at number 46 Spencer Place. It was funded by members of the congregation and many of their skills were utilised to furnish and fit out the 50 seater synagogue. When it opened in 1935, the Chairman of the United Synagogues, Mr. Sandelson declared "It's wonderful! A small congregation of working class people who without outside help, managed to build up such a wonderful temple". The Chassidishe Synagogue was found in 1897 and was based on the 16th century Nusach Ari rite. In the early years of the century it occupied the first floor of an old building at the corner of Hope Street with Bridge Street, still lit by gas lamps. Plans to widen what was to become New York Road forced the demoliton of the building in 1907 and the synagogue moved to premises in Bridge Street. As the jewish population migrated to the Chapeltown area it was decided in 1924 to set up a building fund for a new synagogue in a more convenient location. Spencer Hall was purchased for £700 but the building was unsuitable and the new synagogue was designed. Building work commenced in 1932 and the congregation continued to hold services at the Continental Temperance Hotel, 16-18 Lower Brunswick Place at the invitation of the proprietor, Sholom Addleman.
[internal reference; 20081211_168048:L296.65 P566]
[4]
Chassidishe Synagogue, 46 Spencer Place, interior (Chapeltown)
Black & White imageUndated. Image shows the interior of the Chassidishe Syngagogue at number 46 Spencer Place. It opened in 1935 on the former site of Spencer Hall. The fittings, seen here, were the result of the combined skills of the congregation. The curtain is drawn back to reveal the Ark, made by Barnet Feddy, a cabinet maker. The pulpit was crafted by another cabinet maker, Max Kowalsky and the seating either side of the Ark for the President and the Rabbi was made by the three Collins brothers of S.H. Collins & Co, joiners of number 6 Lower Brunswick Street. Mounted on the wall and flanking the Ark are two prayers, one for the new moon and one for the 'Royal Family', presented by Max Goldberg, a tailor of 7 Renfield Terrace. Above the Ark is a marble tablet inscribed with the 10 commandments which was presented by Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Cohen. An opening ceremony was held in 1935 with a reception held afterwards at the Victory Hotel in Briggate. As the jewish population migrated from Chapeltown the numbers dwindled and the synagogue closed c1983.
[internal reference; 20081212_168049:L296.65 P566]
[5]
Chassidishe Synagogue, 46 Spencer Place, interior view (Chapeltown) (1 comment)
Black & White imageUndated. View from the first-floor showing the interior of ther Chassidishe Synagogue, a purpose built synagogue which opened at number 46 Spencer Place in 1935. Members of the congregation utilised their skills to fit out and furnish the 50 seater synagogue. The seating was provided by Nathan Solomon of Larchfield Mills and upholstered by Mr. Pitt of Northern Veneers Ltd on Leather Street. The white cloth used to cover the Bimmah table on High Festivals was made by Mrs. Jimmy Lewis and Mrs. Maurice Leyton.
[internal reference; 20081212_168052:L296.65 P566]