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Location - Leeds & District

[1]Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory, Aftermath of Explosion (Cross Gates)
Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory, Aftermath of Explosion1918. Image shows a building at Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory after it had been ripped apart by an explosion on the 31st May 1918. This was also the day that King George V and Queen Mary were making a visit to Leeds. Experimental work was being carried out when the explosian occurred and, tragically, three men lost their lives and several workers were injured. Queen Mary sent a Royal message of sympathy and a gift of flowers to the injured.
[2]Refreshment Buffet at Barnbow Munitions Factory (Cross Gates)
Refreshment Buffet at Barnbow Munitions FactoryJune 1916. A refreshment buffet was opened up at the Barnbow munitions factory for the benefit of the women workers who preferred to bring their own food. Beverages of hot milk, cocoa and tea were available for purchase along with biscuits and cakes. The provision of the refreshment buffet meant that the women could obtain a light snack as they arrived off the shift trains and also just before the trains left at the end of their shift. Many women faced a long journey each way and so the buffet was a welcome addition. The catering equipment included a 100 gallon tea infuser, an 80 gallon cocoa boiler and a 40 gallon milk warmer.
[3]Section of Cow Mistals at Barnbow Farm (Cross Gates)
Section of Cow Mistals at Barnbow FarmThe many occupational hazards the women faced at Barnbow included working with chemical propellants which had the effect of turning the exposed skin and hair yellow. Because of this the women workers were dubbed the "Barnbow Canaries". The girls were encouraged to drink plenty of milk to counteract the effects. Barnbow actually had its own farm with a herd of dairy cows producing 300 gallons of milk each day.
[4]Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory, Making Box Lids (Cross Gates)
Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory, Making Box LidsUndated. Image shows girls making box lids for the cartridge packing cases at the Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory during World War 1. Nothing was wasted and the materials from empty propellant boxes were sorted and converted by an entirely female work force. Here they are using circular saws to cut the wood to size.
[5]Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory, Melting House Building (Cross Gates)
Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory, Melting House BuildingEarly 1916. The Melting House building, seen here in the process of construction, was completed in a time frame of six weeks due to the urgent need to begin the filling of shells. Within four weeks a large shell store had been completed and the first shells were unloaded for cleaning and painting. One day before the promised completion date, on the 18th April, 1916, the very first shells were filled. The work was organised into two shifts, and then eventually three, until 6,000 shells were filled each day.
[6]Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory, Boiler House Under Construction (Cross Gates)
Barnbow No. 1. (Leeds) National Filling Factory, Boiler House Under Constructionc1916. In January 1916 the first portion of the Boiler House was completed. The Yorkshire Electric Power Company was to supply the power to drive the heating pumps and provide lighting throughout the factory.
[7]Golden Cross Restaurant, North Street (Sheepscar) (1 comment)
Golden Cross Restaurant, North Streetc1906. View shows the Golden Cross Tea and Dining Rooms at no.216 North Street. Standing beside the doorway are the proprietors Ernest and Muriel Louisa Lee. The young couple had moved into the restaurant after their marriage in 1905 and continued to run the business until the Second World War, after which it was taken over by their son Ernest William Lee who ran it with his wife Florrie until around 1953.
[8]Birds-Eye View of Eastgate (City Centre)
Birds-Eye View of Eastgate20th June 2014. Bird's Eye view, taken from the 4th floor of National Deposit House, number 1 Eastgate. It shows that preparations are in place for the demolition of the Eastgate terrace from numbers 10 (the corner where the white double decker bus can be seen) to 46, far left. Numbers 8, left, and 6 Eastgate are visible at the right edge. Between the properties is the junction with Harewood Street. This side of Eastgate, dating from the late 1930s, and the area glimpsed through the gap, is to be re-developed as Victoria Gate, a large retail and leisure scheme designed by architects, ACME for Hammerson, the owner and manager of the Victoria Quarter. The focus of the retail experience will be a large John Lewis department store, a Marks & Spencer's store, and a pair of street arcades linking John Lewis to the Victoria Quarter. The first phase of the scheme is due for completion in the autumn of 2016. There is a glimpse of Quarry House and the West Yorkshire Playhouse at Quarry Hill at the left edge and also Skyline high rise apartments. In the background, right of centre, there is the tower of Leeds Parish Church. Also seen is the entrance to Kirkgate Market (Leeds City Market) located at the junctions of Ludgate Hill and George Street.
[9]View to the rear of Eastgate (City Centre)
View to the rear of Eastgate4th June, 2014. View to the rear of Eastgate, right, where the Eastgate terrace is in the process of being demolished. This view is looking across Union Street from the car park. The section of Eastgate to be demolished is number 10 to 46. (Number 10 is the end property of the terrace, central to the image.) The gable end facing the camera belongs to 13 Harewood Street, left, and number 8 Eastgate, right. In the background on the left the rear of County House in Harewood Street is visible. This building fronts Vicar lane and is numbered 68 to 78. The whole of the site in this image will be redeveloped as Victoria Gate, a retail and leisure scheme. At the lower end of Eastgate, on the site of the former Millgarth Police Headquarters, there will be an 800 space multi-storey car park. Adjacent to it will be a huge department store, the first John Lewis store to be built in Leeds. Connecting to John Lewis, on the site seen here, will be the Victoria Gate Arcades. These twin arcades will go through to Harewood Street and link to the Victoria Quarter. They are designed to compliment the historic architecture of Leeds. The first phase of the development is due for completion in Autumn, 2016.
[10]Eastgate undergoing demolition (City Centre)
Eastgate undergoing demolition4th June, 2014. View to the rear of properties in Eastgate where the site is being cleared for the new Victoria Gate development, a mix of retail and leisure. Included in the scheme will be the first John Lewis store to be built in Leeds city centre and this iconic building will be a main focus along with twin arcades linking through to the Victoria Quarter. In the background, right, the Regent Street flyover (painted blue) is visible carrying the A58 (Inner Ring Road). Numbers 33 to 35 Eastgate can be seen in the centre background.
[11]The Headrow looking East Towards Eastgate (City Centre)
The Headrow looking East Towards Eastgate4th June, 2014. View of The Headrow looking east towards Eastgate. Buildings in Eastgate are sheeted up in preparation for demolition. This is to make way for the Victoria Gate retail and leisure development. The first phase commenced in Spring 2014 and is due for completion in Autumn 2016. The traffic lights seen are at the junction with Vicar Lane. In the centre background, Quarry House is visible.
[12]Demolition in Eastgate (City Centre) (1 comment)
Demolition in Eastgate4th June, 2014. View of demolition underway at the bottom of Eastgate. This is to make way for the new development known as Victoria Gate, comprising 42,000 sq.m. of retail and leisure space. The building in the process of demolition is number 44 to 46 Eastgate, formerly Hoagy's Bar. It has also been known for many years as one of the "Book End" buildings, the other being on the opposite side of Eastgate. A new, four storey, flagship John Lewis store will occupy part of the huge site. It will have a restaurant on the top floor and the design of the building is said to be influenced by Leeds's textile and cloth heritage. In the background the line of Harewood Street is visible which will be pedestrianised under the scheme. It frames the north-south connection between Kirkgate Market (the domes of which can be seen left), Eastgate and Phase 2 of the development.
[13]From Millgarth Police Headquarters towards Eastgate (City Centre)
From Millgarth Police Headquarters towards Eastgate4th June, 2014. View from Millgarth Police Headquarters, left, towards Eastgate where demolition is in progress. The red brick buildings are a continuation of Sir Reginald Blomfield's designs for the Headrow and Eastgate, begun in the late 1920s. The two end building are virtually identical and are known as the "Book End" buildings (1939). They flank Eastgate where the double decker buses can be seen. Union Street runs between the Police HQ. and the partially demolished numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate, left. Numbers 44 to 46 were formerly Hoagy's Bar but the demolition is to facilitate the new Victoria Gate scheme and a new four storey, 24,00 sq. m. John Lewis store is to be built on part of the site in Phase 1. Millgarth Police HQ. will also be cleared to build an 800 space multi-storey car park.
[14]From Eastgate, Demolition in Progress (City Centre)
From Eastgate, Demolition in Progress4th June, 2014. View from the bottom of Eastgate showing demolition underway on one of the "Book End" buildings located at numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate. This was formerly known as Hoagy's Bar but it is being demolished to make way for the new flagship John Lewis store, part of a huge retail and leisure development called Victoria Gate. Phase 1, which includes John Lewis, a multi-storey car park with 800 spaces and twin street arcades, is due for completion in 2016. The yellow advertising in the background, right, celebrates "The Grand Depart, Yorkshire". This important cycling event will commence with an opening ceremony to be held at the Leeds Arena on the 3rd July, 2014 and the first stage of the race, from Leeds to Harrogate, will begin on Saturday, the 5th July.
[15]Demolition of numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate (City Centre)
Demolition of numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate20th June 2014. Images shows the demolition in progress of one of the brick buildings at the bottom of Eastgate, numbers 44 to 46. Built in the late 1930s, this building and the virtually identical one opposite have always been known as the "Book End" buildings. They were an extension to the scheme for the Headrow and Eastgate begun by Sir Reginald Blomfield in the late 1920s. Numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate have been occupied by Hoagy's Bar in recent years. The view centrally is towards Harewood Street and beyond to the Victoria Quarter. In the background left the domes visible mark the perimeter of Kirkgate Market. The site is to be developed as Victoria Gate, a two phase scheme, the first of which commenced in the spring of 2014 and is due for completion in the autumn of 2016. The demolition, seen here, is to make way for the flagship John Lewis Store, a 24,000sqm iconic building on four storeys. On an adjacent site, formerly occupied by Millgarth Police Station, there will be a multi-storey car park with 800 spaces.
[16]Eastgate from the car park in Union Street showing demolition in progress (City Centre)
Eastgate from the car park in Union Street showing demolition in progress20th June 2014. View from the car park in Union Street to Eastgate showing demoltion in pogresd fo one of the 'Book End' buildings. The demoliton of numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate, formerly Hoagy's Bar, is part of Phase 1 of the new retail and leisure development to be known as 'Victoria Gate'. These red brick buildings lining Eastgate were a continuation of Sir Reginald Blomfield's scheme for the Headrow and Eastgate begun in the late 1920s and early 1930s. The first phase of the Victoria Gate development will include a flagship John Lewis Store, the Victoria Gate Arcade, a twin street arcade linkiing the Victoria Quarter to the Jon Lewis store and a multi-storey car park with 800 spaces. The first phase is expected to open in the Autumn of 2016.
[17]Demolition of numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate, formerly Hoagy's Bar (City Centre)
Demolition of numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate, formerly Hoagy20th June 2014. View of demolition in progress of numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate, formerly Hoagy's Bar. This is known as the 'Book End' buildings, one of a pair that flank the bottom of Eastgate and date from 1939. Demolition is necessary to faciliate the building of the flagship John Lewis store which is part of Phase 1 of the Victoria Gate scheme. Phase 1 also involves the demolition of Millgarth Police Station and an 800 space multi-storey car park will be constructed on the site. There will be twin street arcades to link John Lewis with the Victoria Quarter and Victoria Gate will bring 42,000sqm of retail and leisure to the city.
[18]Demolition in Progress on the Victoria Gate site (City Centre)
Demolition in Progress on the Victoria Gate site4th June 2014. View from the central reservation at the bottom of Eastgate showing demolition in progress on numbers 44 to 46 Eastgate, formerly Hoagy's Bar. The site is boarded up and there are large information boards announcing 42,000m2 of retail, restaurant and leisure space, which will be known as Victoria Gate. The first phase of the Victoria Gate development will include a four storey, 24,600m2, flagship department store for John Lewis and twin street arcades linking to the Victoria Quarter. Millgarth Police Station is the red brick buiding (1976,) seen centrally, which will shortly be demolished to erect an 800 space multi-storey car park for the scheme. On the far left of the image is Skyline, a 49 metre high rise apartment block on 16 storeys which was completed in 2009.
[19]Shadwell Lane in the direction of Main Street (Shadwell)
Shadwell Lane in the direction of Main StreetUndated. View of Shadwell Lane looking in the direction of Main Street. On the right the old Temperance Hotel can be seen before it was modernised. It was originally built as two cottages by mason Edward Tarbotton in the early 1760s on land acquired from the Lord of the Manor in 1756 by his father John, also a stone mason. For many generations the cottages were owned by the Stead family and became known as Stead's Cottages. In 1889 they were converted to a Temperance Hotel and by 1913 the building was called Temperance Cafe. It bacame the focus of village events and dances and wrestling matches were held there. Nowadays known a Temperance Cottage, it is addressed as number 2 Main Street. Courtesy of Shadwell Local History Society.
[20]Shadwell Lane looking towards the junction with Main Street and Holywell Lane (Shadwell)
Shadwell Lane looking towards the junction with Main Street and Holywell Lane1910. Early view of Shadwell Lane looking towards the junction with Main Street and Holywell Lane. The row of 5 terraced houses in the centre are numbered 1 to 9 Main Street and are marked on an O.S. map dated 1908. Holywell Lane curves round to the left of them. On the right is the Temperance Hotel which was converted from two 18th century cottages in 1889. Formerly they had been known as Stead's Cottages and had been in the Stead family for generations. The property became a focal point for villages activities including dances, wrestling matches and Sunday School events. Throughout the 2nd World War it was used as an ARP centre for Shadwell. From 1930 the building became known as Temperance Cottage. Courtesy of Shadwell Local History Society.