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[1]Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, Edith Cliff and patients outside "Blighty" hut (Gledhow)
Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, Edith Cliff and patients outside "Blighty" hutc1915-1919. This view of Gledhow Hall Military Hospital during the First World War shows the Commandant, Miss Edith Cliff, along with a group of soldiers with varying injuries outside one of the small huts in the grounds. The hut, named Blighty, was one of 7 which had two beds in each with a radiator between, and was open at the front with a waterproof sheet that could be drawn down. These were used as part of a pioneering outdoor treatment of surgical cases. One of the soldiers is holding the hospital's mascot, a doll dressed in a soldier's uniform which was known as "Sergeant Michael Cassidy".
[2]Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, nurses and patients (Gledhow)
Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, nurses and patientsc1915-1919. View shows a group of nurses and patients of Gledhow Hall Military Hospital during the First World War. They are gathered in the grounds in front of 6 of the 7 huts that were built for the care of the most severe cases. The huts, named Blighty, Shrapnel Chase, The Dug Out, Somme Hut, Whiz-Bang Hall, BEF and Snipers View, could be reached by a temporary covered way from the Hall. Two larger huts named King George and King Edward were added later.
[3]Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, Nursing staff (Gledhow)
Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, Nursing staffc1915-1919. View shows a group of nurses in Gledhow Hall while it was being used as a military hospital during the First World War. Many of these were VADs, members of the Voluntary Aid Detachment set up in 1909 by the British Red Cross Society and the Order of St. John, to care for wounded and ill soldiers. Initially the VADs were seen as an uneasy addition to the staff of a military hospital, lacking the advanced skill and discipline of professionally trained nurses, but as the war progressed relations improved as the valuable contribution made by the VADs was recognised. The VADs did the work of ward and surgery sisters, parlour maids and house maids alongside 2 trained sisters and 3 servants.
[4]Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, Nursing staff (Gledhow)
Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, Nursing staffc1915-1919. View shows a group of nursing staff sitting in the grounds of Gledhow Hall Military Hospital during the First World War. Many of these would have been Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) nurses, part of an organisation set up by the British Red Cross Society and the order of St. John to care for wounded soldiers. The staff of Gledhow Hall comprised Miss Edith Cliff (Commandant), Mrs Florence Kitson (Honorary Secretary), Miss K Sykes (Quartermaster)and Dr. Eustace Carter (Medical Officer), alongside 2 trained sisters, 12 VAD nurses and 3 servants. Pictured here are: on seats, from left: G. Middleton, H. McLaren, Sister Roff, Sister Ruscoe, F. Kitson, E. Cliff, S. Powys, O. Middleton. Seated on ground, from left: R. Lupton, C. Wickestead, G. Powys, E. Firth, R. Wickestead, H. Lumb.
[5]Gledhow Hall, Military Hospital (Gledhow)
Gledhow Hall, Military Hospitalc1915-1919. View of Gledhow Hall on Gledhow Lane, taken during the First World War when it was being used as a Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) Hospital for wounded servicemen. Several patients are seen recuperating in the grounds. Gledhow Hall was seen as a pioneer among VAD hospitals in the outdoor treatment of surgical cases. Seven huts were built in the grounds for the worst cases, with 2 beds in each hut and a radiator in between. Amusements and entertainments were seen as paramount in the rehabilitation of the soldiers with many sporting activities and drama and concert performances organised, as well as creative writing, crafts and needlework. The hospital closed on 31st March 1919 having treated a total of 2250 patients.
[6]Edith Cliff, Commandant of Gledhow Hall Military Hospital (Gledhow)
Edith Cliff, Commandant of Gledhow Hall Military Hospital1916. View shows Edith Cliff, Commandant of Gledhow Hall Military Hospital, sitting at her desk. Born in 1871, Edith began training as a VAD (Voluntary Aid Detachment) nurse in 1911. This organisation had been created jointly by the British Red Cross Society and the Order of St John in 1909 to care for wounded and ill soldiers. Most VADs were completely voluntary so had to be ladies of independent means, as Edith Cliff was. She was the cousin of Lord Airedale, Albert Ernest Kitson, who offered the family estate, Gledhow Hall, to be used as a military hospital during the First World War. Miss Cliff was appointed commandant and kept a scrapbook of photographs, letters and articles relating to life at Gledhow Hall, from which this and other photos from this collection came. Edith Cliff was awarded an OBE after the war for her devoted service. She married Sir Thomas Willans Nussey in 1935 when aged 63 and died in 1962 at the age of 90.
[7]Gledhow Hall, Military Hospital (Gledhow)
Gledhow Hall, Military Hospitalc1915-1919. View shows Gledhow Hall on Gledhow Lane, taken at the time it was being used as a military hospital during the First World War. Some of the patients can be seen relaxing on the grass in front. The Gledhow Estate had been purchased from Elizabeth I by John Thwaites in 1601 and he (or his son, also John) built the original Gledhow Hall. Several owners followed before Jeremiah Dixon who is believed to have rebuilt the hall as it is today around 1769, to designs by Carr of York. More owners came and went before Sir James Kitson, 1st Baron Airedale, a Liberal MP and Lord Mayor of Leeds, bought the hall in 1883. He died in 1911, and his son, Albert Ernest, 2nd Baron Airedale, offered the hall as a Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) hospital. Edith Cliff, his cousin, became Commandant. This photo, along with many others, was taken from a scrapbook compiled by Miss Cliff during her time here.
[8]Woodhouse Lane, junction with Albion Street, showing Jet Dry Cleaners (City Centre)
Woodhouse Lane, junction with Albion Street, showing Jet Dry Cleaners1955. View of Woodhouse Lane showing the junction with Albion Street on the right. Jet Dry Cleaners, with posters proclaiming "opening shortly", occupy the premises on the corner, numbered as 136 Albion Street. This company would later become known as Super Jet with branches on The Headrow and Lower Briggate. Saffman & Co, solicitors, are based on the floor above. The building has since been demolished to make way for St. John's Centre. On the far right is Wellworthy Piston Rings Ltd, at no. 137 Albion Street.
[9]The Headrow, Super Jet Dry Cleaners (City Centre)
The Headrow, Super Jet Dry Cleanersc1960's. View of the south side of The Headrow showing nos. 1-9. No.7 in the centre is Super Jet Dry Cleaners, offering a 45 minute express service. Next door at no.9 (right) is the Three Legs public house.
[10]The Headrow, Super Jet Dry Cleaners (City Centre)
The Headrow, Super Jet Dry Cleanersc1960s. View of the south side of The Headrow showing Super Jet Dry Cleaners at no. 7 in the foreground, with a member of staff seen outside. Further along are two public houses, the Three Legs (Tetley's) and The Vine (Bass).
[11]West Street, no. 157, Broadhurst's Dining Rooms (City Centre)
West Street, no. 157, Broadhurstc1900. Photograph shows Tom Broadhurst's Dining Rooms at no. 157 West Street by the corner with Primitive Street. Standing by the door are Mrs Lucy Broadhurst (nee Croft), born in 1857, and her daughter Pearl Beatrice Broadhurst (1881-1964). Both were born in Willenhall, Staffordshire. Advertisements for Brook Bonds Tea and various theatres (Queens, City Varieties, The Grand and the Coliseum) can be seen.
[12]West Street, no. 157, Broadhurst's Dining Rooms (City Centre)
West Street, no. 157, Broadhurstc1910s. Image shows Mrs Lucy Broadhurst, wearing a full-length apron, standing outside the family business, Tom Broadhurst's Dining Rooms at no. 157 West Street by the corner with Primitive Street. Mrs Broadhurst (nee Croft) was born in Willenhall, Staffordshire in 1857 and moved to Leeds sometime around the 1880s. This photo was taken about 1910-1915.
[13]York Road, nos. 902-904, 912, 918 (Seacroft)
York Road, nos. 902-904, 912, 918Undated. View shows the north-east side of York Road. The first two houses on the right are numbered 902 and 904, then the detached house next to them is no. 912. Moving to the left the white-coloured house is no. 918. Taken between 1975 and 1995.
[14]York Road, looking north-west (Seacroft)
York Road, looking north-westUndated. View looking north-west along York Road showing no. 1045 on the left, then no. 1047 occupied by Frank Myers (Welding Supplies) Ltd. Further along is a block containing nos. 1069-1075. Taken sometime between 1975 and 1995.
[15]The Green, nos. 43-49 (Seacroft)
The Green, nos. 43-49Undated. View of houses on The Green, in the centre nos. 43-45 and to the right nos. 47-49. Taken sometime between 1975 and 1995.
[16]The Green, from York Road (Seacroft)
The Green, from York RoadUndated. View looking across The Green from York Road. Originally the village green of Seacroft village, it is noted as being one of the oldest in the country still in existence today. It is now mainly used as a cricket pitch. The Cricketer's Arms public house is seen at the far side of The Green, with the block of high-rise flats Queensview behind it. To the right is Seacroft Grange, also known as Tottie Hall, which was at one time occupied by Seacroft Primary School but was probably at the time an Adult Education Centre. Taken between 1975 and 1995.
[17]York Road, nos. 920-922 (Seacroft)
York Road, nos. 920-922Undated. View of a pair of semi-detached houses numbered 920 (right) and 922 (left) York Road, situated just off the main road at right angles to it. Taken between 1975 and 1995.
[18]York Road, no. 896 (Seacroft)
York Road, no. 896Undated. View shows a dental surgery at no. 896 York Road. This building was formerly a police house which was at one time occupied by Bobby Brown, the local village bobby. Taken sometime between 1975 and 1995.
[19]Seacroft Village Hall, York Road (Seacroft)
Seacroft Village Hall, York RoadUndated. View shows Seacroft Village Hall, situated on York Road opposite St. James's Church. It was built in 1933 as the Darcy Bruce Wilson Institute, named after the last lord of the manor of Seacroft, who died in 1936. Photograph taken between 1975 and 1995.
[20]Dawson's Court, nos. 2 - 3 (Seacroft)
DawsonUndated. View of Dawson's Court off York Road showing no. 3 on the left followed by no. 2. On the right are the rears of houses facing onto Stocks Rise. Taken between 1975 and 1995.