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[1]St. Simon's Church of England School Rugby League Team (Burley)
St. Simon1951/1952. Group portrait of St. Simon's Church of England School Rugby League Team, taken in the 1951/1952 season. Although St. Simon's was one of the smallest schools in the league, the team achieved successful results that season, finishing top of the league. The school was situated on the north-west side of Ventnor Street at the junction with St. Simon Street, off about 158 Kirkstall Road. St. Simon's Church was located opposite the school. The school and church were demolished and nowadays the site is occupied by ITV plc, formerly the Yorkshire Television Studios. Building work commenced on the studios in 1967.
[2]St. Simon's Church of England School Rugby League Team (Burley) (2 comments)
St. Simon1951/1952. Image shows the proud rugby league team of St. Simon's Church of England School. The photograph was taken at the end of the 1951/1952 season when St. Simon's came top of the league. This was a great achievement as St. Simon's was one of the smallest schools in the league. In the centre, displaying the cup, is Fred Pickup. He went on to play for Leeds Rugby League in the 1960s. The National School, and St. Simon's Church opposite, along with other old property, were part of a clearance scheme in the 1960s. The large site, fronting Kirkstall Road, was sold off to build Yorkshire Television Studios, now ITV plc. Buidling commenced in 1967.
[3]Ingram Road Primary School, Brown Lane (Holbeck) (1 comment)
Ingram Road Primary School, Brown Lanec1990s. Side view of the old Ingram Road Primary School seen from the Ingram Road end, with the front facing onto Brown Lane on the right. Rydall Place is seen at the far end. The school, built c1904, had already been partially demolished by this time, and the building seen here was soon to follow, with a new, modern Ingram Road Primary School being built on the site.
[4]Ingram Road Primary School, Brown Lane (Holbeck) (3 comments)
Ingram Road Primary School, Brown Lanec1990s. View of Ingram Road Primary School, seen from Brown Lane by the corner with Rydall Place, right. Ingram Road itself is at the far end of the school. Built c1904, the school is seen here shortly before it was to be demolished; some of the school buildings around the back had already been pulled down before 1986. A brand new Ingram Road Primary School was to be built on the site. Two stone panels, seen above the doorways here, were rescued from the demolition and incorporated into the brick wall surrounding the new school (see image 2006126_160485).
[5]Seacroft Grange Primary School, maypole dancers (Seacroft)
Seacroft Grange Primary School, maypole dancersc1954. View shows Maypole dancers from Seacroft Grange Primary School. The girl with a long pigtail and checked skirt at the front is Margareta Rysnik. The school was situated at the time in the old Seacroft Grange building, or Tottie Hall as it was once known, beside Seacroft Green.
[6]Stone Row, family group (Gildersome)
Stone Row, family group1905. Image shows a mother, Mrs. Margaret Buttrey (nee Whitehead) and her small twin daughters, Amy and Annie in front of stone-built cottages known as Stone Row. The twins were born on the 25th July, 1902 and were three years old at the time of the photograph. The Buttrey family lived at the house next to the end cottage on the right of the picture. Mrs Buttrey is listed on the 1901 Census as living in Town Street with her husband, Watson Buttrey, and their children, adopted son, Thomas Whitehead, 21, son Wilson E., 13 and daughters, Elizabeth and Mary M. aged 11 years and 10 months respectively. The twins were not yet born at the time of the 1901 Census. Mr Buttrey worked as the Keeper of the Cemetery, which was at the rear of Stone Row, and Thomas worked as an engine man in a coal mine. Wilson had the occupation of tile and pipe maker. The stone gateposts in the foreground to the left of the row would appear to be at the entrance of a ginnel leading in the direction of the cemetery. Stone Row is not marked by name on the 1908, 1920s and 1930s OS maps but the row of six cottages can be clearly seen on the maps, on the west side of Street Lane not far from the junction with Church Street and Town Street. According to the daughter of Amy Buttrey (one of the twins), who was born here herself, the row was demolished some time in the 1950s. Nowadays, the site of Stone Row is occupied by businesses and housing numbering from approximately 130 to 156, Street Lane.
[7]South Accommodation bridge under construction (Hunslet)
South Accommodation bridge under constructionc1898/1899. Image shows the new South Accommodation Road bridge under construction. It was built in 1899 to replace an earlier iron suspension bridge designed by George Leather and dating from 1828. By the late 1800s the suspension bridge was inadequate for the increased volume of traffic crossing the River Aire at this point. A new lattice girder bridge was designed by Leeds City Engineer, Thomas Hewson, and in 1898 the building commenced. The completed bridge had a span of 146 ft and was 50 ft wide. This view looks east across the bridge towards Bridge View, left, at the junction with South Accommodation Road, and to the Bridgewaters. More recently the bridge was replaced yet again by the Inner ring Road bridge (part of Stage 6) which was constructed alongside. This new bridge is sometimes referred to as Richmond Bridge.
[8]South Accommodation Bridge under construction (Hunslet)
South Accommodation Bridge under constructionc1898/1899. View across the new South Accommodation Bridge which is being built to replace the old iron suspension bridge (designed by George Leather in 1828) which could no longer cope with the heavier volume of traffic crossing the River Aire at this point. The new bridge was designed with a lattice girder structure by Leeds City Engineer, Thomas Hewson. It would be 50 ft in width with a span of 146 ft when completed. This view looks east and shows Bridge View on the left, a row of terraced homes back-to-back with John Eaton Street. South Accommodation Road bridge was once more replaced as part of stage 6 of the Inner Ring Road and is sometimes referred to as 'Richmond Bridge.'
[9]South Accommodation Road, bridge under construction (Hunslet)
South Accommodation Road, bridge under constructionc1898/1899. Construction workers pause for a photograph in this late nineteenth century view. They are building the new lattice girder bridge to take South Accommodation Road across the River Aire. Designed by the City Engineer, Thomas Hewson, the bridge was to be constructed with a 146 ft span and a width of 50 ft. It replaced the former iron suspension bridge designed by George Leather in 1828. Amongst the workers in their flat caps (no hard hats in those days!) are a couple of bowler-hatted gentlemen. It is quite possible that one of these is Thomas Hewson on an inspection of the construction work in progress. The bridge has since been replaced as part of stage 6 of the Inner Ring Road scheme.
[10]A.R.P. Rescue Centre, training exercise (Killingbeck)
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, training exercise1940. Image shows a training exercise taking place at the A.R.P. (Air Raid Precaution) Rescue Centre in Selby Road. The demonstration is being observed by a group of invited dignitaries. The tall man, wearing a dark overcoat and hat, is believed to be Anthony Eden,who was Secretary of State for War in Churchill's government through much of 1940. There is some doubt about this identification so we would appreciate any further information. Seen directly behind the man in the rescue harness is William Noel Slee who was in charge of the unit. He lived in the Fearnvilles, Leeds 8. On the right the man, wearing glasses and a light coloured jacket, is Maurice Tomlinson, the proprietor of J. Tomlinson & Son, builders of Bath Road, Leeds 11, and also the manager of the A.R.P. Rescue Centre. He lived on the road to Temple Newsom in Whitkirk. The single storey buildings of the Centre were demolished but the foundations still remain. The road is now known as Killingbeck Bridge.
[11]A.R.P. Rescue Centre, Selby Road, training exercise (Killingbeck)
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, Selby Road, training exercise1940. Image shows a training exercise taking place at the A.R.P. (Air Raid Precaution) Rescue Centre in Selby Road. The unit was formed to act in the rescue of people in bombed areas of Leeds and surrounding districts during World War 2. It was also called out to York and, in particular Hull where there was heavy bombing. The men are demonstrating some of the rescue equipment with the aid of a dummy. In charge of the unit, and wearing a white tin hat with his hands on hips, is William Noel Slee who lived in The Fearnvilles, Leeds 8. The year after this photograph was taken, in 1941, he left the rescue unit upon being called up to serve in the R.A.F. The single storey buildings occupied by the Rescue Centre were demolished but the foundations remain. They were situated at the junction of Selby Road with the A.64. The road is now called Killingbeck Bridge.
[12]A.R.P. Rescue Centre, group portrait of the rescue team (Killingbeck)
A.R.P. Rescue Centre, group portrait of the rescue team1940. Group portrait showing some of the members of the rescue team at the A.R.P. Rescue Centre in Selby Road. In charge of the unit is William Noel Slee who can be seen standing at the extreme left of the back row, wearing a white shirt and dark tie. Any other identifications are welcomed. The men were trained and equipped to respond to the aftermath of bombing raids during World War 2 and to rescue and evacuate casualties. Their work covered Leeds and surrounding areas but the unit was also called out to York and was in demand following the heavy bombing raids suffered by the population of Hull. The centre occupied a range of single storey buildings at the junction of Selby Road and the A.64. Although the buildings are now demolished the foundations remain. The road is now called Killingbeck Bridge.
[13]Otley Road, new housing development (Guiseley)
Otley Road, new housing development2010. Image shows a recently built housing development in Otley Road. It is built on the former site of the landmark Silver Cross factory, manufacturers of the famous brand of prams and pushchairs and demolished in 2006. The Silver Cross brand still continues to thrive today, however (2014). The stone building in the background, right, is the end of Morton Terrace while in the foreground, right, a sign is visible for the Benfield Ford dealership in Otley Road. Image courtesy of Anne North & Guiseley Methodist Church.
[14]Silver Cross Works in Otley Road (Guiseley)
Silver Cross Works in Otley Road2004. View of Silver Cross Works in Otley Road, taken in 2004. The firm ceased manufacturing the famous brand of prams and pushchairs here in 2002. By 2006 a new housing development was under construction on the site. In the foreground, right, is the entrance to the Benfield Ford dealership in Otley Road. Image courtesy of Anne North & Guiseley Methodist Church.
[15]Otley Road from the junction of Ings Lane (Guiseley)
Otley Road from the junction of Ings Lane2010. View from the junction of Ings Lane (left) showing new development in Otley Road. The scheme comprises 40 2-bedroomed flats, 38 3-bedroomed homes, 7 2-bedroomed properties and an office block. It occupies the former site of the well-known landmark Silver Cross factory, manufacturers of the luxury brand of prams and pushchairs. The factory ceased production in 2002, was purchased by the Woodford Group in 2004 and demolished in 2006. The Silver Cross brand, however, continues to thrive up to the present day (2014). Back Lane is visible on the right. Image courtesy of Anne North & Guiseley Methodist Church.
[16]Silver Cross Works from the junction with Ings Lane (Guiseley)
Silver Cross Works from the junction with Ings Lane2004. View of Silver Cross Works in Otley Road, taken from the junction with ings Lane, left. This was around the time the old landmark factory was purchased by th Woodford Group with a view to redevelopment of the site for housing. Although the Silver Cross brand of prams and pushchairs still thrives today (2014)production ceased here in 2002. By 2006 the old factory was in the process of demolition and now the site is occupied by 40 2-bedroomed flats, 38 3-bedroomed homes, 7 2-bedroomed properties and an office block. Behind the car on the right the junction with Back Lane is visible. Image courtesy of Anne North & Guiseley Methodist Church.
[17]Otley Road, new housing development on the site of Silver Cross Works (Guiseley)
Otley Road, new housing development on the site of Silver Cross Works2010. Image shows Otley Road and the new housing development recently built on the former site of Silver Cross Works. Siver Cross Works, the firm of Lawrence Wilson & Son Ltd., is famous for the manufacture of the luxury brand of prams and pushchairs. Although the firm was bought out the name of Silver Cross still continues to thrive today (2014) but the landmark factory on this site ceased production in 2002. It was purchased by the Woodford Group in 2004. Following demolition this new housing development was built, comprising 40 2-bedroomed flats, 38 3-bedroomed homes, 7 2-bedroomed properties and an office block. On the left is Nethermoor Park where the home ground of Guiseley A.F.C. is located. Image courtesy of Anne North & Guiseley Methodist Church.
[18]Silver Cross Works, Otley Road, demolition in progress (Guiseley)
Silver Cross Works, Otley Road, demolition in progress2006. View of demolition in progress at the Silver Cross Works in Otley Road. The firm of Lawrence Wilson & Son Ltd. had been manufacturing the famous luxury brand of prams and pushchairs here since 1936 until production ceased in 2002. The factory had originally been built for Hugh Claughton in the 1880s and was known as the Nether Moor Boot Factory. The Woodford Group purchased the site in 2004 and plans were approved for a new housing development comprising 40 2-bedroomed flats, 38 3-bedroomed homes, 7 2-bedroomed properties and an office block. Image courtesy of Anne North & Guiseley Methodist Church.
[19]The Springfields (Guiseley)
The Springfields2010. View of the newly built Springfields development by Chartford Homes Ltd. and comprising two three storey blocks of flats, one containing twelve homes and the other, five. Also included are six retail/office units. The flats are built on the former site of Springfield Mills off Otley Road. Image courtesy of Anne North & Guiseley Methodist Church.
[20]The Springfields development under construction, Otley Road (Guiseley)
The Springfields development under construction, Otley Road2008. Image shows the Springfield development under construction, as viewed from the car park of HSBC in Otley Road. Planning was approved in 2006 for Chartford Homes Ltd. to construct one three storey block of 12 flats, one three storey block of 5 flats and 6 retail/office units on the former site of Springfield Works and car park. Image courtesy of Anne North & Guiseley Methodist Church.