leodis logo

Leeds City Council

Open archives compliant site

Supported by BIG Lottery Fund

Enrich UK Lottery Fund

Results Found (100), Result Page (1 of 5)
Search Aspect (Latest additions)
Location - Leeds & District

[1]Roundhay Park, Waterloo Lake, motor boat (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, Waterloo Lake, motor boatUndated. Image of Waterloo Lake, Roundhay Park, showing the motor boat "Gibraltar" filled with passengers at the Electric Launch Landing Stage. A boathouse is seen in the background. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[2]The Hollies, wintry scene (Weetwood)
The Hollies, wintry sceneUndated. View of a wintry scene at The Hollies, showing a wooden bridge crossing the mill stream. This is part of the grounds presented to the City of Leeds by George Brown in 1921, in memory of his son, Major Harold Brown, a casualty of the First World War. It is now a section of the Meanwood Valley Trail between Woodhouse Moor and Golden Acre Park. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[3]Roundhay Park Zoo, Lemon-Crested Cockatoos (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park Zoo, Lemon-Crested Cockatoos1923. View shows a zoo-keeper tending to the Lemon-Crested Cockatoos in the small zoo at Roundhay Park, which was situated in the Canal Gardens area. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[4]Roundhay Park Zoo, "Doggie" (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park Zoo, "Doggie"Undated. View shows a monkey at Roundhay Park Zoo, possibly a type of baboon. With a dog-like face he was given the name "Doggie". Roundhay Park Zoo, situated in Canal Gardens, was a popular attraction in the park around the 1920s or 1930s. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[5]Roundhay Park Zoo, "Billie and his better half" (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park Zoo, "Billie and his better half"Undated. This photograph labelled "Billie and his better half" shows a male and female deer at Roundhay Park Zoo. The zoo, situated in Canal Gardens, was a popular attraction in the park around the 1920s or 1930s. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[6]Middleton Park, woodland scene (Middleton)
Middleton Park, woodland sceneUndated. Image showing a woodland scene at Middleton Park. The park covers an area of 630 acres, including 200 acres of ancient woodland as well as traditional parkland. Once a private estate belonging to the Manor of Middleton, it was later taken over by Wade's Charity, who leased it to the City Council as a public park in 1920. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[7]Roundhay Park, Bird Sanctuary, nesting boxes (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, Bird Sanctuary, nesting boxesUndated. View shows a member of staff of the Parks department climbing a tree in the Bird Sanctuary at Roundhay Park to attach nesting boxes. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[8]Roundhay Park, Bird Sanctuary, nesting boxes (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, Bird Sanctuary, nesting boxesUndated. View shows a member of the Parks department staff attaching a nesting box to a tree in the Bird Sanctuary at Roundhay Park. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[9]Roundhay Park, Upper Lake (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, Upper LakeUndated. View showing Upper Lake at Roundhay Park with reflections of trees visible in the water. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[10]Temple Newsam, Gibbet Stone (Temple Newsam)
Temple Newsam, Gibbet StoneUndated. View of the Gibbet Stone at Temple Newsam Gardens. Designed as an arbour, this feature to the south of Temple Newsam House was built in 1920 on a stone platform, but was taken down in 1945. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[11]Roundhay Park, Coronation House (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, Coronation HouseUndated. View shows a display of flowers in Coronation House at Roundhay Park. This glass conservatory opened in 1911 in the Coronation Gardens, built on the site of an earlier conservatory. It was rebuilt in 1939 and then again in the 1980s when it became part of the Tropical World attraction, which has recently (2017) reopened following a further facelift. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[12]Roundhay Park, wintry scene (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, wintry sceneUndated. A wintry scene at Roundhay Park, showing a woodland area below the Upper Falls. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[13]Parks Department, Civic Wreath for Queen Alexandra (Unknown)
Parks Department, Civic Wreath for Queen Alexandrac1925. View shows a civic wreath from the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of the city of Leeds in token of affection of the late Queen Alexandra, widow of Edward VII, who died on 20th November 1925. The wreath was designed by Thomas R. Trigg, F.R.H.S., Chief Officer of the Parks and Cemeteries Department. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[14]Woodhouse Moor, litter picking (Woodhouse)
Woodhouse Moor, litter pickingApril 2016. View shows volunteers from the local community clearing up litter on Woodhouse Moor (facing onto Moorland Road). There had been complaints concerning littering by some users of the park. Bins can be seen overloaded in the background, and the rubbish appears largely to be food and drink waste. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[15]Woodhouse Moor, Hyde Park Unity Day, Dog Show (Woodhouse)
Woodhouse Moor, Hyde Park Unity Day, Dog Showc2010. A crowd at Hyde Park Unity Day (Woodhouse Moor) look on eagerly as a dog showman prepares another trick. Unity Day is held annually, usually in July, though the exact date is kept secret until shortly before the event to maintain the local, community character of the event. The event is planned and run by volunteers, and funded by donations from the public. The event originated in response to the perceived breakdown in community cohesion following severe rioting in the area in the mid-1990s. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[16]Woodhouse Moor, Hyde Park Unity Day (Woodhouse)
Woodhouse Moor, Hyde Park Unity Dayc2010. Attendees at Hyde Park Unity Day on Woodhouse Moor are enjoying a dancing or workout session. Unity Day is held annually, usually in July, though the exact date is kept secret until shortly before the event to maintain the local, community character of the event. The event is planned and run by volunteers, and funded by donations from the public. The event originated in response to the perceived breakdown in community cohesion following severe rioting in the area in the mid-1990s. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[17]Roundhay Park, cycle race (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, cycle raceUndated. View shows a record-setting race at the Roundhay Park cycle track, around the 1950s or 1960s, which produced the fastest last 200 metres ever recorded at the track. The five riders shown are named as (from left to right): P. McArthy (obscured), Jeff Cresswell, Barry Hoban, Jeff Jaques and Keith Womersley. Other cyclists can be seen on the right, in the middle of the track, watching the race. Race officials and a photographer can be seen near the finish line. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[18]Roundhay Park, looking towards Upper Lake (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, looking towards Upper LakeMay 2010. Image shows the path round the ravine heading towards the back of the Upper Lake at Roundhay Park. The lake was set out during the mid-nineteenth century, and surrounded by woods. In the 1880s, the Council altered the lake to a uniform depth of three feet, to allow people to skate safely upon it. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[19]Roundhay Park, children's cycle race (Roundhay)
Roundhay Park, childrenc2014. View shows a children’s race in progress at the start-finish line of the grass velodrome at Roundhay Park. An engaged audience can be seen in the background. The grass velodrome was built as part of the sports arena at Roundhay Park in 1897, and, by the close of the nineteenth century, audiences numbered to up to ten thousand. Grass track bicycles are equipped with a single-speed transmission and no brakes. A ban on road racing in the 1930s and 1940s increased the popularity of grass racing, and time trials started in the park in secret at this time due to the road ban. The West Riding Track League was formed in 1947, and the sport remained popular up until the 1970s, when road racing rejuvenated. Recently grass racing has itself undergone a renaissance: as of 2017, there were over 200 riders registered in the League, with around 100 children racing weekly. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).
[20]Cross Flatts Park, Fun Trail (Beeston)
Cross Flatts Park, Fun Trail2016. Image shows children playing on equipment as part of the Cross Flatts Park Fun Trail. Multiple park apparatus are present, including swings, a slide and a see-saw. Parents are seen engaging with their children in play, while other park users can be seen socialising in the background. This image was digitised as part of the ‘Future Prospects of Urban Parks’ project, conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Council, supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (grant number: AH/N001788/1).